Eco-Chefs Kids Culinary Cookbook
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Eco-Chefs Kids Culinary Cookbook


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After being involved with a childrens cooking class in a low income town located right outside of Providence, I took it upon myself to create a Culinary Cookbook geared towards children, providing recipes that are easy to make, yet incredibly satisfying. The term Eco-Chefs, as I state below, 20 dollars a week, to cook for 20 kids twice a week. Economical. And, I did my best to provide organic, sustainable food whenever possible.

My goal was to incorporate vegetables into dishes, begrudgingly against the children’s will, and do whatever I could to take anything we made and turn it into a healthier version WITHOUT compromising the taste. Not to mention, cooking enough food for BOTH classes, on a budget of 20 dollars a week. That’s 10 dollars a class! Too many times to count, the leftovers at the end of the day left the other kids begging for just a taste of what we had. It didn’t matter what it was.  Read more...

After being involved with a childrens cooking class in a low income town located right outside of Providence, I took it upon myself to create a Culinary Cookbook geared towards children, providing recipes that are easy to make, yet incredibly satisfying. The term Eco-Chefs, as I state below, 20 dollars a week, to cook for 20 kids twice a week. Economical. And, I did my best to provide organic, sustainable food whenever possible.

My goal was to incorporate vegetables into dishes, begrudgingly against the children’s will, and do whatever I could to take anything we made and turn it into a healthier version WITHOUT compromising the taste. Not to mention, cooking enough food for BOTH classes, on a budget of 20 dollars a week. That’s 10 dollars a class! Too many times to count, the leftovers at the end of the day left the other kids begging for just a taste of what we had. It didn’t matter what it was.

I was constantly taking into consideration what we had on hand, and what we could make with it. A big bag of rice and a lot of leftover flour can stretch a lonnnnng way.

I want to send out a big thank you to the Program Director, Nick Vockerodt, for his support, patience, and enthusiasm involved with the after school-cooking program.

I also owe a large thank you to Apeiron Institute of sustainability and Elisabeth Bux for funding this program and letting it be.

I cannot give thanks without mentioning my colleague “Miss” Nora Hansanugrum. Your help this year has been tremendous and as cliché as it is to say this, I really cannot put into words how much I truly appreciated your help and how great it was to have you in class with us. Thank you.

And lastly, to all the children who were in my class and all the children who were never in my class. It would not have been half as what it was without all of you. You are all such incredibly bright and wonderful people. And although there were some ups and downs along the way I looked forward to that class every week.

Another thanks goes to Dave Rocheleau and Johnson & Wales for all their contributions this year, Kath Connolly, Dolores at the front desk and all involved with the LCCS. It’s been a great ride.

And now… on to what really matters.
...Show less

Cookbook Recipes
Filter By & Scroll Down:                              
Cookbook Recipe
Succulent Stir Fry
 
Cookbook Recipe
Awesome Oven Baked Pizzas
 
Cookbook Recipe
Outrageous Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
 
Cookbook Recipe
Perfect Pasta Primavera
 
Cookbook Recipe
The Best Brownies and Chocolate Icing
 
Cookbook Recipe
Fruit Salsa & Homemade Tortilla Chips
 
Cookbook Recipe
Kickin' Chicken Taco's
 
Cookbook Recipe
Awesomely White Cornmeal Cornbread
 
Cookbook Recipe
Chocolate Chocolate Chip cookie Ice Cream Sandwiches
 



More Great Cookbooks: After Dinner | Appetizer | Asian | Central American
Filter By & Scroll Down:                              

Cookbook Recipe
Succulent Stir Fry
This is a very simple, basic recipe with a few key elements to always making a great stir-fry. FIRST: The Soy Sauce and The Sesame Oil. These two are at the base of Asian cooking and will pretty much make any dish taste delicious. I always grab the “less sodium” soy sauce. It tastes just as good and doesn’t have the impact of all the extra sodium (salt). SECOND: Fresh Veggies! It doesn’t matter what. If it’s a vegetable, in it goes.

Cookbook Recipe
Awesome Oven Baked Pizzas
I remember this day. It was crazy. Thankfully though, Nora and I had the help of an extra Chef and about five or six other Johnson & Wales students. I really believe that if we didn’t have their help, we wouldn’t have been able to really pull this off as well as we did. I think with the recipe presented here, we were able to make 10 or 11 individualized pizzas for almost every student in the class. And they were nice six slice 13-inch pizzas. This was a great day and I’m still amazed we got it done. The instructions may be a little lengthy, but it is absolutely necessary for creating a delicious, crispy, fluffy, well-defined, crust-like pizza. If you want to do this at home, cutting the recipe in half will be plenty for a family of 4 to 6.

Cookbook Recipe
Outrageous Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Cookbook Recipe
Perfect Pasta Primavera

Cookbook Recipe
The Best Brownies and Chocolate Icing

Cookbook Recipe
Fruit Salsa & Homemade Tortilla Chips
This recipe is so easy and just simply genius. A friend did this in class one day, so I’d like to thank her for her brilliance. We only did Strawberries and Mango, but any fruit here will do. Kiwi, Blackberries, Pineapple… you name it.

Cookbook Recipe
Kickin' Chicken Taco's
This recipe was one of Miss Nora’s contributions amongst many others to the class. She diced and marinated the chicken overnight, which was then cooked with a little onion and garlic. Serve in a taco shell with chopped lettuce, a little salsa, cheese and maybe some sour cream or avocado. Delicious.

Cookbook Recipe
Awesomely White Cornmeal Cornbread

Cookbook Recipe
Chocolate Chocolate Chip cookie Ice Cream Sandwiches
This was done on the last day by request of a student (no surprises there) as a fun, quick, and easy to do treat before the summer sendoff.

After being involved with a childrens cooking class in a low income town located right outside of Providence, I took it upon myself to create a Culinary Cookbook geared towards children, providing recipes that are easy to make, yet incredibly satisfying. The term Eco-Chefs, as I state below, 20 dollars a week, to cook for 20 kids twice a week. Economical. And, I did my best to provide organic, sustainable food whenever possible. My goal was to incorporate vegetables into dishes, begrudgingly against the children’s will, and do whatever I could to take anything we made and turn it into a healthier version WITHOUT compromising the taste. Not to mention, cooking enough food for BOTH classes, on a budget of 20 dollars a week. That’s 10 dollars a class! Too many times to count, the leftovers at the end of the day left the other kids begging for just a taste of what we had. It didn’t matter what it was. I was constantly taking into consideration what we had on hand, and what we could make with it. A big bag of rice and a lot of leftover flour can stretch a lonnnnng way. I want to send out a big thank you to the Program Director, Nick Vockerodt, for his support, patience, and enthusiasm involved with the after school-cooking program. I also owe a large thank you to Apeiron Institute of sustainability and Elisabeth Bux for funding this program and letting it be. I cannot give thanks without mentioning my colleague “Miss” Nora Hansanugrum. Your help this year has been tremendous and as cliché as it is to say this, I really cannot put into words how much I truly appreciated your help and how great it was to have you in class with us. Thank you. And lastly, to all the children who were in my class and all the children who were never in my class. It would not have been half as what it was without all of you. You are all such incredibly bright and wonderful people. And although there were some ups and downs along the way I looked forward to that class every week. Another thanks goes to Dave Rocheleau and Johnson & Wales for all their contributions this year, Kath Connolly, Dolores at the front desk and all involved with the LCCS. It’s been a great ride. And now… on to what really matters.

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Cookbook Recipe
Eco-Chefs Kids Culinary Cookbook

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After being involved with a childrens cooking class in a low income town located right outside of Providence, I took it upon myself to create a Culinary Cookbook geared towards children, providing recipes that are easy to make, yet incredibly satisfying. The term Eco-Chefs, as I state below, 20 dollars a week, to cook for 20 kids twice a week. Economical. And, I did my best to provide organic, sustainable food whenever possible. My goal was to incorporate vegetables into dishes, begrudgingly against the children’s will, and do whatever I could to take anything we made and turn it into a healthier version WITHOUT compromising the taste. Not to mention, cooking enough food for BOTH classes, on a budget of 20 dollars a week. That’s 10 dollars a class! Too many times to count, the leftovers at the end of the day left the other kids begging for just a taste of what we had. It didn’t matter what it was. I was constantly taking into consideration what we had on hand, and what we could make with it. A big bag of rice and a lot of leftover flour can stretch a lonnnnng way. I want to send out a big thank you to the Program Director, Nick Vockerodt, for his support, patience, and enthusiasm involved with the after school-cooking program. I also owe a large thank you to Apeiron Institute of sustainability and Elisabeth Bux for funding this program and letting it be. I cannot give thanks without mentioning my colleague “Miss” Nora Hansanugrum. Your help this year has been tremendous and as cliché as it is to say this, I really cannot put into words how much I truly appreciated your help and how great it was to have you in class with us. Thank you. And lastly, to all the children who were in my class and all the children who were never in my class. It would not have been half as what it was without all of you. You are all such incredibly bright and wonderful people. And although there were some ups and downs along the way I looked forward to that class every week. Another thanks goes to Dave Rocheleau and Johnson & Wales for all their contributions this year, Kath Connolly, Dolores at the front desk and all involved with the LCCS. It’s been a great ride. And now… on to what really matters.