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HalFire: A Passion for HotWings!


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HalFire: A Passion for HotWings!
11 Recipes
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Cookbook Recipes
Cookbook Recipe
Wingazette Magazine® Spice Mix
 
Cookbook Recipe
About The Ingredients In This Cookbook:
 
Cookbook Recipe
Beginner's Hot Wings
 
Cookbook Recipe
Dante’s 3 Ulcer Wings
 
Cookbook Recipe
Hotter Than Hal Hotwings
 
Cookbook Recipe
Turner’s Burners
 
Cookbook Recipe
Turner’s Torchers
 
Cookbook Recipe
Pat Neely’s Wings
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ghost of Christmas Future Wings
 
Cookbook Recipe
Healthier Than Hal Hot Wings
 
Cookbook Recipe
Hal’s Ultra-Blue Cheese Dressing
 
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Cookbook Recipe
Wingazette Magazine® Spice Mix
In the first days of wing making, we used to measure 1/8 teaspoons of multiple spices to get the right level of flavor in our wing sauce. It didn’t take long to figure out that pre-mixing the spices would lead to easier and faster cooking. We are proud to share the secret recipe of herbs and spices that yields unequaled flavor in our mixtures.

Cookbook Recipe
About The Ingredients In This Cookbook:
About Ingredients: Chicken Wings We prefer Buffalo Style chicken wings over every other type of wings. A true Buffalo Style chicken wing is not breaded, but deep fried to crisp perfection, then dipped in a flavorful, cayenne pepper based sauce mixture. The debate still rages about celery, carrots, blue cheese and ranch dressing as accompaniments. Legend holds that Buffalo Style chicken wings originated at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, NY, and that celery and blue cheese were served with the first wings. At the time of invention, chicken wings were often discarded or only used for making chicken stock. We prefer a smaller wing, which goes against today’s marketing of “Jumbo Chicken Wings” that are advertised in many restaurants today. We go to great lengths to work with a local butcher to find the smallest, most tender sectioned wings available. Sometimes, we are able to find 1 oz. wing sections! We prefer a wing that is deep-fried in peanut oil. Although it is expensive, peanut oil holds up better to extreme high cooking temperatures better than other oils, leading to superior crispness. Alternative method: A trade secret from a former great wing joint is to mix four parts flour with one part Lawry’s Seasoning Salt. Use a pinch at a time to sprinkle the mixture lightly over the wings, then refrigerate for 24 hours. Although this is not a “traditional” Buffalo style wing, it is an interesting variation for increasing the crispness of the crust. Another alternative method: Boil the wings in water for 10 minutes and drain before broiling wings in the oven. Boiling renders the fat out of the wing and makes it possible to get really crisp wings in the oven under the broiler. Broil about 5-6 inches away from the broiler for about 5-8 minutes before turning and broiling another 5-8 minutes. Celery Proper celery selection and preparation are very important in delivering a superior wing experience. Improper selection and preparation can quickly destroy a wing experience. Begin by selecting the lightest green celery you can find. Dark green celery tends to be tough and often has an overwhelming bad flavor. Preparation starts with slicing the stalks to remove knuckle joints and bottom ends. Thorough washing is very important for food safety, as dirt is often visible on the stalks. We insist on at least a 20 minute hydration time in ice water after slicing. Carrots We don’t really have standards for carrots, as we don’t serve them with wings. We do try to avoid the baby carrots, as they are prepared with chemicals we don’t want to ingest. Blue Cheese Dressing There are many types and brands of Blue Cheese Dressing available, and we have enjoyed many of them over the years. Here is our current best recommendation base on experience: Salemville® Smokehaus Blue Cheese crumbles: The wonderful flavor of applewood smoke sets this cheese apart from all others. Bolthouse® Farms Chunky Blue Cheese Yogurt dressing: Creamy, chunky and delicious, this yogurt dressing is low fat and low carbohydrate and available in the refrigerated case at your grocer. Clemson Blue Cheese : www.campusdish.com The first Clemson University Blue Cheese was cured in Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel in 1941. Since then, the homemade gourmet item has worked its way into the hearts and stomachs of an ever growing number of aficionados. The history and folklore surrounding this scenic spot in the Blue Ridge mountains is legendary in the Piedmont area of South Carolina. The name Stumphouse originated from the Indian Legend of Isaqueena. The Indian Legend The Indian maiden Isaqueena fell in love with David Francis, a silversmith who lived near what is now Ninety Six, South Carolina. Learning that her tribe planned a surprise attack on her lover's settlement, Isaqueena mounted her pony and hastened to warn the settlers. On that fleet, silent ride through the forest, she mentally named the landmarks she passed en route: Mile Creek, Six Mile, Twelve Mile, Eighteen Mile, Three and Twenty , Six and Twenty, and finally Ninety Six. Today in South Carolina there are the post offices of Six Mile and Ninety Six, and the creeks bearing these names that Isaqueena conferred upon them. She estimated her journey at ninety six miles. It is actually 92 miles from her starting point in Ninety Six, South Carolina. Isaqueena and David, according to the legend, fled into the mountains to escape the fury of her betrayed tribe. The lovers lived in a large hollow tree or Stumphouse. Finally tracked down by her tribesmen, Isaqueena raced to a nearby falls (now Isaqueena Falls) and plunged out of sight into the cataract. Believing her dead the warriors gave up the search, but Isaqueena later joined her husband and fled to Alabama to live happily ever after. The Tunnel Pioneers of Southern industry dreamed of a railroad connecting the fertile Midwest with the busy port of Charleston, South Carolina. The tunnel through Stumphouse Mountain was to be a vital link in that road. The work was begun in 1852, and in 1859 the completion of the tunnel was anticipated within 2 years. It was the Blue Ridge Railroad (now the Anderson division of the Southern-affiliated Carolina and Northwestern Railway) that attempted to construct this line through and over the mountains to Knoxville, Tennessee. North-South hostilities halted the work. After the war, efforts to reactivate the project failed and the tunnel was abandoned. Clemson College bought the tunnel in 1951. The south entrance of the tunnel became a historic landmark in South Carolina. The cool, refreshing breeze which blows out of the tunnel is long remembered by summer visitors. The tunnel measures 25 feet high by 17 feet wide and extends 1600 feet through a granite formation into the heart of Stumphouse Mountain. At the midway point, a 16 by 20 foot air shaft extends upward 200 feet to the surface. Cold air moving out of the mouth of the tunnel pulls warm air down the shaft. The moisture in this warm air is condensed by the cold air in the tunnel to produce a constant wetness in the tunnel, which is favorable for curing blue cheese. The Cheese Research Project The unfinished Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel lay idle for 80 years, visited by tourists and picnickers through the years, but serving no useful purpose. In 1940 an alert Clemson College professor recognized the possibilities of curing blue mold cheese in the tunnel. With this thought in mind, the Clemson College Dairy Department began experimenting with the manufacture of blue cheese and curing it in the tunnel. The debris which had accumulated during three quarters of a century was cleared out, equipment for cheese curing was moved in, and the project was off to a successful beginning. The outbreak of World War II in 1941 limited production, and the work was discontinued in 1944. Clemson lost skilled specialists; the milk used for cheese was needed for aviation cadets quartered on campus; and litigation arose as to the ownership of the tunnel. In 1951 Clemson College was successful in purchasing the tunnel. With adequate milk supplies again available, Operation Blue Cheese was re-initiated. Operations were resumed on an experimental basis in 1953. Selected Brown Swiss and Holstein milk from Clemson dairy herd consisting of 680 animals was used to make the Roquefort-style blue mold cheese. The cheese was manufactured on campus, transported 30 miles, and cured in the tunnel. In October 1953, some 2500 pounds of Blue cheese was curing in the depths of Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel. The production was directed by D.H. Graham, a native of Mississippi and a recent Ph.D. from Iowa State College. He joined the Clemson Dairy staff in August, 1953, to initiate the manufacture of Blue cheese and carry on other dairy products research. Indications were that the product would be ready for market in April or May 1954. The Clemson Dairy Department was pleasantly anticipating the time when cheese connoisseurs over the country could again enjoy the tangy, piquant flavor of Clemson Blue Cheese. Blue cheese was cured in the tunnel from 1953 to 1956. The environmental conditions in the tunnel were carefully analyzed, mold strains suited for these conditions were developed, and curing procedures were investigated. Curing in the tunnel was suspended during the summer months because of the warm temperature. The Agricultural Center in Newman Hall was built at Clemson in 1956. Air conditioned cheese rooms were designed to duplicate the tunnel's high humidity and temperature. Research studies were begun on the campus early in 1956. The air conditioned rooms have eliminated the need for suspending operations during the warm summer months, which was necessary in the tunnel. In 1958, all manufacturing and curing of Blue Cheese was conducted on campus. In 1970, the tunnel was leased to the Pendleton Historical District Commission, which converted the area into a picnic spot and tourist attraction. The south entrance of the tunnel was a historic landmark in South Carolina for many years. After a rockslide inside the tunnel in the mid 1990's, the tunnel was closed to visitors. After strenuous safety testing, the city of Walhalla has reopened the tunnel as a landmark site. Clemson Blue Cheese was always been an artisanal cheese, made the old fashioned way. Each 288 gallon vat makes a batch of about 240 lbs, which is then salted, waxed and aged for 6 months. When it is ready, each hoop is scraped and packaged by hand. Each lot is kept separate, and meticulous record keeping assures quality at every step. Ranch Dressing If you are going to serve Ranch Dressing, it must be Hidden Valley Ranch®. Any other brand or recipe is a recipe for disappointment. Horseradish Our hands down favorite is Atomic® Extra Strong Horseradish. You can order online at the online address. We prefer driving across town to Fresh Market to purchase it there. Aptly named over 45 years ago, Atomic Horseradish has served the hospitality industry using the same closely guarded recipe. It’s the choice of exclusive hotels, resorts and national restaurant chains. The exact, flavorful, extra hot horseradish is now available for your personal use. Most people first discover Atomic in a nice restaurant, ask about it and Google it because Atomic Horseradish is not advertised! The California horseradish is very, very hot. Parsnips are added to control its natural bitterness, resulting in extreme heat, mushrooming through your sinuses leaving you with the satisfying flavor of real horseradish that’s as good if not better than your granddad’s homemade that chased you out of the house when you were a kid. http://truenaturaltaste.com/atomic-horseradish/ Frank’s RedHot® Buffalo Wing Sauce This is the base for most of our Buffalo style sauces. It’s thick viscosity and tremendous flavor combines the cayenne, butter and vinegar flavor into an easy –to-use product. French Fries We prefer a square cut fry, no shoestrings or crinkle cuts. The perfect fry would be a 3/8” square cut potato, much like Kroger Fries. Steak fries are another good choice. Many times, we find that a quality fry is useful for picking up the last of the wing sauce on a plate. We like to “burn” ours, going a couple of extra minutes on the cooking. An acceptable alternative fry is the Alexia® Seasoned Waffle Cut Fries. Onion Rings Onion Rings are another satisfactory complement to wings. Alexia® Panko Breaded Onion Rings are our favorite choice. Ketchup Red Gold® is our choice as the best tasting ketchup on the planet. Founded in 1942 in Indiana as a family business, Red Gold® produces the best tomato products you can find. We’ve tested This brand against the giant of the industry and Red Gold® wins every time. Soy Sauce Kikkoman® Soy Sauce is the clear winner of all available brands. A sauce that has been in production for over 300 years says something about quality and flavor. Mayonnaise Duke’s® Mayonnaise is our choice as the best tasting mayonnaise in the world. Founded in 1917 in Greenville, SC, they are still using the original recipe. Until now, the product was only available in the South, but they have expanded their reach nationally. Worcestershire Sauce First made at 60 Broad Street, Worcester, England, by two dispensing chemists, John Wheeley Lea and William Henry Perrins, the Lea & Perrins brand was commercialized in 1837 and has been produced in the current Midlands Road factory in Worcester since 16 October 1897. It was purchased by H.J. Heinz Company in 2005 who continue to manufacture and market "The Original Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce", under the name Lea & Perrins, as well as Worcestershire sauce under their own name and labeling. Dry Mustard Founded in England in 1814, Coleman’s mustard is the only acceptable mustard powder for our recipes. Iced Tea Luzianne® is our only choice for iced tea. Here is the reason why, best explained by their website: Iced tea has come a long way since the 1870s, when the first recipes for this uniquely American refreshment started showing up in print. How do we know? Well, we have over a century of experience in the tea business. During that time, we saw iced tea popularized during the sweltering summer at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, and we perfected the art of creating authentic Southern iced tea. We take the extra steps to carefully select tea leaves that are exactly right for iced tea. That’s why we travel the world selecting only those leaves that will make a smooth, clear, refreshing glass of iced tea. Just the way iced tea should be. And since our blend of tea is specially blended for iced tea, it’s no surprise that Luzianne holds a special place in the hearts of tea drinkers throughout the South.

Cookbook Recipe
Beginner's Hot Wings
This is the ideal sauce for a novice wing eater. No experience required to try this recipe.

Cookbook Recipe
Dante’s 3 Ulcer Wings
This is a mild recipe that won't upset Dante's ulcers.

Cookbook Recipe
Hotter Than Hal Hotwings
The recipe that gave birth to Wingazette® Magazine in July of 1990 (www.wingazette.com). Hotter Than Hal wings remain a favorite when you don’t have time to cook your wing sauce. WARNING: THIS RECIPE NOT FOR THE WEAK OF STOMACH

Cookbook Recipe
Turner’s Burners
One of the recipes that started it all! Appearing in the first issue of Wingazette® Magazine, Turner's Burners has stood the test of time. This was our first recipe that called for cooking the wing sauce. Use extreme caution during and after consumption. Do not touch any mucous membranes for a 24 hour period after eating this recipe. WARNING! THIS RECIPE IS NOT FOR THE WEAK OF STOMACH! PROFESSIONAL WING EATERS ONLY!

Cookbook Recipe
Turner’s Torchers
The peak of excitement in wing eating, Turner’s Torchers were developed to celebrate the announcement of the Olympic Games for Atlanta in 1996.

Cookbook Recipe
Pat Neely’s Wings
We revised this recipe in August 2011, after we suffered a very thin, runny sauce. We actually simplified the recipe and removed some of the butter fat. This recipe comes from the Food Network, but it does not appear on their website. Pat Neely said during the episode that he never gives this recipe out… so we felt lucky to get it.

Cookbook Recipe
Ghost of Christmas Future Wings
This recipe was discovered over the Christmas holidays in 2011. The level of pain can be adjusted with additional drops of the Ghost Pepper sauce. To quote from the bottle..."more than one drop...Ghost Pepper...is suicide." This recipe uses 5 drops - not for the faint of heart or novice wing eater - this one is for "seasoned" pros. In 2007, Guinness World Records certified the Bhut Jolokia as the world's hottest chili pepper, 401.5 times hotter than Tabasco sauce. Since then, the Infinity chilli, Naga Viper pepper, and the Trinidad Scorpion Butch T pepper have surpassed the Bhut Jolokia's Scoville rating.

Cookbook Recipe
Healthier Than Hal Hot Wings
This recipe represents a major breakthrough for diabetics who want to enjoy good Buffalo Wings! A ten piece order of Buffalo wings and a good size portion of fries and celery and dressing that fits a diabetic meal plan! OK, we won’t kid you – removing the skin from the wings is a LOT of work, and could be done well in advance of the meal for planning purposes. The end result of the recipe is about 4 ounces of lean white meat. The fries represent 3 carb allowances or about 45 grams of carbohydrate – ideal for our meal plan. The celery and dressing have miniscule amounts of carbs – we use a low-fat, low-carb ranch or blue cheese. The bottom line is that now we can have wings whenever we feel the urge without having to worry about high blood sugar as an after-effect! It is very important to use particular brand names for the recipe, or all bets are off on the nutritional info. Wing Time® Super Hot Buffalo Wing Sauce is the only sauce for this recipe, but we would probably allow any other Wing Time® flavor. This terrific tasting sauce is available via their website, and is low in fat – only ½ gram saturated! There are no trans fats in Wing Time® Buffalo Wing Sauce. The real reason for using it – you’ll probably never taste a better sauce that comes straight out of the bottle. Alexia™ Gourmet Quality Yukon Gold Julienne Fries with Sea Salt are the only allowable fries. These fries are cooked in trans-fat-free vegetable oils, and have no saturated fat at all. The Sea Salt keeps the sodium level down, and following the cooking directions yields a crisp, flavorful fry.

Cookbook Recipe
Hal’s Ultra-Blue Cheese Dressing
The perfect fire extinguisher for the previously listed wing recipes, Hal’s Ultra-Blue is praised for its simplicity as well as its flavor.

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Wingazette Magazine® Spice Mix
In the first days of wing making, we used to measure 1/8 teaspoons of multiple spices to get the right level of flavor in our wing sauce. It didn’t take long to figure out that pre-mixing the spices would lead to easier and faster cooking. We are proud to share the secret recipe of herbs and spices that yields unequaled flavor in our mixtures.


About The Ingredients In This Cookbook:
About Ingredients: Chicken Wings We prefer Buffalo Style chicken wings over every other type of wings. A true Buffalo Style chicken wing is not breaded, but deep fried to crisp perfection, then dipped in a flavorful, cayenne pepper based sauce mixture. The debate still rages about celery, carrots, blue cheese and ranch dressing as accompaniments. Legend holds that Buffalo Style chicken wings originated at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, NY, and that celery and blue cheese were served with the first wings. At the time of invention, chicken wings were often discarded or only used for making chicken stock. We prefer a smaller wing, which goes against today’s marketing of “Jumbo Chicken Wings” that are advertised in many restaurants today. We go to great lengths to work with a local butcher to find the smallest, most tender sectioned wings available. Sometimes, we are able to find 1 oz. wing sections! We prefer a wing that is deep-fried in peanut oil. Although it is expensive, peanut oil holds up better to extreme high cooking temperatures better than other oils, leading to superior crispness. Alternative method: A trade secret from a former great wing joint is to mix four parts flour with one part Lawry’s Seasoning Salt. Use a pinch at a time to sprinkle the mixture lightly over the wings, then refrigerate for 24 hours. Although this is not a “traditional” Buffalo style wing, it is an interesting variation for increasing the crispness of the crust. Another alternative method: Boil the wings in water for 10 minutes and drain before broiling wings in the oven. Boiling renders the fat out of the wing and makes it possible to get really crisp wings in the oven under the broiler. Broil about 5-6 inches away from the broiler for about 5-8 minutes before turning and broiling another 5-8 minutes. Celery Proper celery selection and preparation are very important in delivering a superior wing experience. Improper selection and preparation can quickly destroy a wing experience. Begin by selecting the lightest green celery you can find. Dark green celery tends to be tough and often has an overwhelming bad flavor. Preparation starts with slicing the stalks to remove knuckle joints and bottom ends. Thorough washing is very important for food safety, as dirt is often visible on the stalks. We insist on at least a 20 minute hydration time in ice water after slicing. Carrots We don’t really have standards for carrots, as we don’t serve them with wings. We do try to avoid the baby carrots, as they are prepared with chemicals we don’t want to ingest. Blue Cheese Dressing There are many types and brands of Blue Cheese Dressing available, and we have enjoyed many of them over the years. Here is our current best recommendation base on experience: Salemville® Smokehaus Blue Cheese crumbles: The wonderful flavor of applewood smoke sets this cheese apart from all others. Bolthouse® Farms Chunky Blue Cheese Yogurt dressing: Creamy, chunky and delicious, this yogurt dressing is low fat and low carbohydrate and available in the refrigerated case at your grocer. Clemson Blue Cheese : www.campusdish.com The first Clemson University Blue Cheese was cured in Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel in 1941. Since then, the homemade gourmet item has worked its way into the hearts and stomachs of an ever growing number of aficionados. The history and folklore surrounding this scenic spot in the Blue Ridge mountains is legendary in the Piedmont area of South Carolina. The name Stumphouse originated from the Indian Legend of Isaqueena. The Indian Legend The Indian maiden Isaqueena fell in love with David Francis, a silversmith who lived near what is now Ninety Six, South Carolina. Learning that her tribe planned a surprise attack on her lover's settlement, Isaqueena mounted her pony and hastened to warn the settlers. On that fleet, silent ride through the forest, she mentally named the landmarks she passed en route: Mile Creek, Six Mile, Twelve Mile, Eighteen Mile, Three and Twenty , Six and Twenty, and finally Ninety Six. Today in South Carolina there are the post offices of Six Mile and Ninety Six, and the creeks bearing these names that Isaqueena conferred upon them. She estimated her journey at ninety six miles. It is actually 92 miles from her starting point in Ninety Six, South Carolina. Isaqueena and David, according to the legend, fled into the mountains to escape the fury of her betrayed tribe. The lovers lived in a large hollow tree or Stumphouse. Finally tracked down by her tribesmen, Isaqueena raced to a nearby falls (now Isaqueena Falls) and plunged out of sight into the cataract. Believing her dead the warriors gave up the search, but Isaqueena later joined her husband and fled to Alabama to live happily ever after. The Tunnel Pioneers of Southern industry dreamed of a railroad connecting the fertile Midwest with the busy port of Charleston, South Carolina. The tunnel through Stumphouse Mountain was to be a vital link in that road. The work was begun in 1852, and in 1859 the completion of the tunnel was anticipated within 2 years. It was the Blue Ridge Railroad (now the Anderson division of the Southern-affiliated Carolina and Northwestern Railway) that attempted to construct this line through and over the mountains to Knoxville, Tennessee. North-South hostilities halted the work. After the war, efforts to reactivate the project failed and the tunnel was abandoned. Clemson College bought the tunnel in 1951. The south entrance of the tunnel became a historic landmark in South Carolina. The cool, refreshing breeze which blows out of the tunnel is long remembered by summer visitors. The tunnel measures 25 feet high by 17 feet wide and extends 1600 feet through a granite formation into the heart of Stumphouse Mountain. At the midway point, a 16 by 20 foot air shaft extends upward 200 feet to the surface. Cold air moving out of the mouth of the tunnel pulls warm air down the shaft. The moisture in this warm air is condensed by the cold air in the tunnel to produce a constant wetness in the tunnel, which is favorable for curing blue cheese. The Cheese Research Project The unfinished Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel lay idle for 80 years, visited by tourists and picnickers through the years, but serving no useful purpose. In 1940 an alert Clemson College professor recognized the possibilities of curing blue mold cheese in the tunnel. With this thought in mind, the Clemson College Dairy Department began experimenting with the manufacture of blue cheese and curing it in the tunnel. The debris which had accumulated during three quarters of a century was cleared out, equipment for cheese curing was moved in, and the project was off to a successful beginning. The outbreak of World War II in 1941 limited production, and the work was discontinued in 1944. Clemson lost skilled specialists; the milk used for cheese was needed for aviation cadets quartered on campus; and litigation arose as to the ownership of the tunnel. In 1951 Clemson College was successful in purchasing the tunnel. With adequate milk supplies again available, Operation Blue Cheese was re-initiated. Operations were resumed on an experimental basis in 1953. Selected Brown Swiss and Holstein milk from Clemson dairy herd consisting of 680 animals was used to make the Roquefort-style blue mold cheese. The cheese was manufactured on campus, transported 30 miles, and cured in the tunnel. In October 1953, some 2500 pounds of Blue cheese was curing in the depths of Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel. The production was directed by D.H. Graham, a native of Mississippi and a recent Ph.D. from Iowa State College. He joined the Clemson Dairy staff in August, 1953, to initiate the manufacture of Blue cheese and carry on other dairy products research. Indications were that the product would be ready for market in April or May 1954. The Clemson Dairy Department was pleasantly anticipating the time when cheese connoisseurs over the country could again enjoy the tangy, piquant flavor of Clemson Blue Cheese. Blue cheese was cured in the tunnel from 1953 to 1956. The environmental conditions in the tunnel were carefully analyzed, mold strains suited for these conditions were developed, and curing procedures were investigated. Curing in the tunnel was suspended during the summer months because of the warm temperature. The Agricultural Center in Newman Hall was built at Clemson in 1956. Air conditioned cheese rooms were designed to duplicate the tunnel's high humidity and temperature. Research studies were begun on the campus early in 1956. The air conditioned rooms have eliminated the need for suspending operations during the warm summer months, which was necessary in the tunnel. In 1958, all manufacturing and curing of Blue Cheese was conducted on campus. In 1970, the tunnel was leased to the Pendleton Historical District Commission, which converted the area into a picnic spot and tourist attraction. The south entrance of the tunnel was a historic landmark in South Carolina for many years. After a rockslide inside the tunnel in the mid 1990's, the tunnel was closed to visitors. After strenuous safety testing, the city of Walhalla has reopened the tunnel as a landmark site. Clemson Blue Cheese was always been an artisanal cheese, made the old fashioned way. Each 288 gallon vat makes a batch of about 240 lbs, which is then salted, waxed and aged for 6 months. When it is ready, each hoop is scraped and packaged by hand. Each lot is kept separate, and meticulous record keeping assures quality at every step. Ranch Dressing If you are going to serve Ranch Dressing, it must be Hidden Valley Ranch®. Any other brand or recipe is a recipe for disappointment. Horseradish Our hands down favorite is Atomic® Extra Strong Horseradish. You can order online at the online address. We prefer driving across town to Fresh Market to purchase it there. Aptly named over 45 years ago, Atomic Horseradish has served the hospitality industry using the same closely guarded recipe. It’s the choice of exclusive hotels, resorts and national restaurant chains. The exact, flavorful, extra hot horseradish is now available for your personal use. Most people first discover Atomic in a nice restaurant, ask about it and Google it because Atomic Horseradish is not advertised! The California horseradish is very, very hot. Parsnips are added to control its natural bitterness, resulting in extreme heat, mushrooming through your sinuses leaving you with the satisfying flavor of real horseradish that’s as good if not better than your granddad’s homemade that chased you out of the house when you were a kid. http://truenaturaltaste.com/atomic-horseradish/ Frank’s RedHot® Buffalo Wing Sauce This is the base for most of our Buffalo style sauces. It’s thick viscosity and tremendous flavor combines the cayenne, butter and vinegar flavor into an easy –to-use product. French Fries We prefer a square cut fry, no shoestrings or crinkle cuts. The perfect fry would be a 3/8” square cut potato, much like Kroger Fries. Steak fries are another good choice. Many times, we find that a quality fry is useful for picking up the last of the wing sauce on a plate. We like to “burn” ours, going a couple of extra minutes on the cooking. An acceptable alternative fry is the Alexia® Seasoned Waffle Cut Fries. Onion Rings Onion Rings are another satisfactory complement to wings. Alexia® Panko Breaded Onion Rings are our favorite choice. Ketchup Red Gold® is our choice as the best tasting ketchup on the planet. Founded in 1942 in Indiana as a family business, Red Gold® produces the best tomato products you can find. We’ve tested This brand against the giant of the industry and Red Gold® wins every time. Soy Sauce Kikkoman® Soy Sauce is the clear winner of all available brands. A sauce that has been in production for over 300 years says something about quality and flavor. Mayonnaise Duke’s® Mayonnaise is our choice as the best tasting mayonnaise in the world. Founded in 1917 in Greenville, SC, they are still using the original recipe. Until now, the product was only available in the South, but they have expanded their reach nationally. Worcestershire Sauce First made at 60 Broad Street, Worcester, England, by two dispensing chemists, John Wheeley Lea and William Henry Perrins, the Lea & Perrins brand was commercialized in 1837 and has been produced in the current Midlands Road factory in Worcester since 16 October 1897. It was purchased by H.J. Heinz Company in 2005 who continue to manufacture and market "The Original Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce", under the name Lea & Perrins, as well as Worcestershire sauce under their own name and labeling. Dry Mustard Founded in England in 1814, Coleman’s mustard is the only acceptable mustard powder for our recipes. Iced Tea Luzianne® is our only choice for iced tea. Here is the reason why, best explained by their website: Iced tea has come a long way since the 1870s, when the first recipes for this uniquely American refreshment started showing up in print. How do we know? Well, we have over a century of experience in the tea business. During that time, we saw iced tea popularized during the sweltering summer at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, and we perfected the art of creating authentic Southern iced tea. We take the extra steps to carefully select tea leaves that are exactly right for iced tea. That’s why we travel the world selecting only those leaves that will make a smooth, clear, refreshing glass of iced tea. Just the way iced tea should be. And since our blend of tea is specially blended for iced tea, it’s no surprise that Luzianne holds a special place in the hearts of tea drinkers throughout the South.


Beginner's Hot Wings
This is the ideal sauce for a novice wing eater. No experience required to try this recipe.


Dante’s 3 Ulcer Wings
This is a mild recipe that won't upset Dante's ulcers.


Hotter Than Hal Hotwings
The recipe that gave birth to Wingazette® Magazine in July of 1990 (www.wingazette.com). Hotter Than Hal wings remain a favorite when you don’t have time to cook your wing sauce. WARNING: THIS RECIPE NOT FOR THE WEAK OF STOMACH


Turner’s Burners
One of the recipes that started it all! Appearing in the first issue of Wingazette® Magazine, Turner's Burners has stood the test of time. This was our first recipe that called for cooking the wing sauce. Use extreme caution during and after consumption. Do not touch any mucous membranes for a 24 hour period after eating this recipe. WARNING! THIS RECIPE IS NOT FOR THE WEAK OF STOMACH! PROFESSIONAL WING EATERS ONLY!


Turner’s Torchers
The peak of excitement in wing eating, Turner’s Torchers were developed to celebrate the announcement of the Olympic Games for Atlanta in 1996.


Pat Neely’s Wings
We revised this recipe in August 2011, after we suffered a very thin, runny sauce. We actually simplified the recipe and removed some of the butter fat. This recipe comes from the Food Network, but it does not appear on their website. Pat Neely said during the episode that he never gives this recipe out… so we felt lucky to get it.


Ghost of Christmas Future Wings
This recipe was discovered over the Christmas holidays in 2011. The level of pain can be adjusted with additional drops of the Ghost Pepper sauce. To quote from the bottle..."more than one drop...Ghost Pepper...is suicide." This recipe uses 5 drops - not for the faint of heart or novice wing eater - this one is for "seasoned" pros. In 2007, Guinness World Records certified the Bhut Jolokia as the world's hottest chili pepper, 401.5 times hotter than Tabasco sauce. Since then, the Infinity chilli, Naga Viper pepper, and the Trinidad Scorpion Butch T pepper have surpassed the Bhut Jolokia's Scoville rating.


Healthier Than Hal Hot Wings
This recipe represents a major breakthrough for diabetics who want to enjoy good Buffalo Wings! A ten piece order of Buffalo wings and a good size portion of fries and celery and dressing that fits a diabetic meal plan! OK, we won’t kid you – removing the skin from the wings is a LOT of work, and could be done well in advance of the meal for planning purposes. The end result of the recipe is about 4 ounces of lean white meat. The fries represent 3 carb allowances or about 45 grams of carbohydrate – ideal for our meal plan. The celery and dressing have miniscule amounts of carbs – we use a low-fat, low-carb ranch or blue cheese. The bottom line is that now we can have wings whenever we feel the urge without having to worry about high blood sugar as an after-effect! It is very important to use particular brand names for the recipe, or all bets are off on the nutritional info. Wing Time® Super Hot Buffalo Wing Sauce is the only sauce for this recipe, but we would probably allow any other Wing Time® flavor. This terrific tasting sauce is available via their website, and is low in fat – only ½ gram saturated! There are no trans fats in Wing Time® Buffalo Wing Sauce. The real reason for using it – you’ll probably never taste a better sauce that comes straight out of the bottle. Alexia™ Gourmet Quality Yukon Gold Julienne Fries with Sea Salt are the only allowable fries. These fries are cooked in trans-fat-free vegetable oils, and have no saturated fat at all. The Sea Salt keeps the sodium level down, and following the cooking directions yields a crisp, flavorful fry.


Hal’s Ultra-Blue Cheese Dressing
The perfect fire extinguisher for the previously listed wing recipes, Hal’s Ultra-Blue is praised for its simplicity as well as its flavor.


I've had a passion for Buffalo style chicken wings for over 20 years. During that time, I've experimented with many different ingredients in creating the best tasting recipes imaginable. This cookbook is a prelude to a much larger work to be released later.
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Cookbook Recipe
HalFire: A Passion for HotWings!

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I've had a passion for Buffalo style chicken wings for over 20 years. During that time, I've experimented with many different ingredients in creating the best tasting recipes imaginable. This cookbook is a prelude to a much larger work to be released later.