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Jean’s Recipe File


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Jean’s Recipe File
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Cookbook Recipes
Cookbook Recipe
German Sweet Chocolate Cake (Mary Lust)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Chrystal’s Chocolate Torte Burgundy
 
Cookbook Recipe
Hattie's Dutch Cocoa Cream Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother's Baking Powder Coffee Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Crumb Streusel Topping for Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother's Spanish Bun Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Grandma Yetta's Crumb Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ellen's Poppy Seed Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother's Jello Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Chocolate Ithaca-Italian Fruit Cake (Pan Papato)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother's Seven-Day Prune Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Strawberry Shortcake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Grandma Yetta’s Biscuits for Old Fashioned Shortcake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother's Matzo-Meal Sponge Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Fanny's Jam Cake (Mother’s Method)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Fanny's Jam Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Lilly’s Jam Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Grandma Yetta's Honey Cake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Sally Jackson's Gourmet Banana Tea Bread
 
Cookbook Recipe
Yvette’s Whole Wheat Pie Crust
 
Cookbook Recipe
Jean’s Simplified Pie Crust
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Apple Pie
 
Cookbook Recipe
“Aunt Mandy’s” Rhubarb Pie
 
Cookbook Recipe
Grandma Yetta’s Lemon Pie
 
Cookbook Recipe
Grandma’s Lemon Pie (Jean’s Version)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Georgia Pecan Pie
 
Cookbook Recipe
Yvette’s Walnut Pie
 
Cookbook Recipe
Rita’s Danish Tarts
 
Cookbook Recipe
Strawberry Devonshire Tart
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Feige’s Strudel
 
Cookbook Recipe
Pirog or Piroghi (Apple, Jam, Cabbage)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Feige’s Bagel
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Cheesecake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Cheesecake à la Sally Jackson
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Fanny’s Plain Cookies
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Fanny’s Rolled Cookies (Rugelach)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Grandma’s Oil-Butter Cookies
 
Cookbook Recipe
Cottage Cheese Cooky Sticks
 
Cookbook Recipe
Jenny Wren Date and Nut Cookies
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Mandelbrat
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mrs. Sumter’s Ice Box Cookies
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Lilly’s Ice Box Cookies
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Nutritionally Sound Peanut Butter Fudge
 
Cookbook Recipe
Lee Pinnell’s Divinity Fudge
 
Cookbook Recipe
Rum Balls
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Candied Orange or Grapefruit Strips
 
Cookbook Recipe
Eli Läuchli’s Elderberry Sirop
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ron’s Glomp
 
Cookbook Recipe
Garlic Vinegar
 
Cookbook Recipe
Cucumber Vinegar
 
Cookbook Recipe
Raspberry Vinegar
 
Cookbook Recipe
Spiced Wine Vinegar
 
Cookbook Recipe
Onion Vinegar
 
Cookbook Recipe
Fruit Filled Clouds
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Yoghourt Ice Cream
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Sarah’s Mousse au Chocolat
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Sarah’s Strawberries Romanoff
 
Cookbook Recipe
Jean’s Sabayon
 
Cookbook Recipe
Chrystal’s Sabayon
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ernie’s Baked Alaska
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Noodle Pudding
 
Cookbook Recipe
“Surprise Thing” Clam Dip
 
Cookbook Recipe
Vegetable Pâté
 
Cookbook Recipe
Saganaki (Flaming Cheese)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Cheese Ribbons (Jenny Wren)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Judy’s Cheese Rounds
 
Cookbook Recipe
Stuffed Grape Leaves
 
Cookbook Recipe
Tranches au Fromage (Swiss grilled cheese sandwich)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Stuffed Mushrooms
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Version of New Joe’s Special
 
Cookbook Recipe
Stuffed Miltz
 
Cookbook Recipe
Meat-Kasha Main Dish
 
Cookbook Recipe
Zel’s Brisket
 
Cookbook Recipe
Pilimieni
 
Cookbook Recipe
Piroshki
 
Cookbook Recipe
Meatballs
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Breast of Lamb
 
Cookbook Recipe
Rita’s Beef Strogonoff
 
Cookbook Recipe
Baked Fish à la Aunt Sarah
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Sauce for fish
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Gefilte Fish
 
Cookbook Recipe
Grandma’s Marinated Herring
 
Cookbook Recipe
Boeuf Fondue Bourguignonne
 
Cookbook Recipe
Carl’s Cabbage Cream Pie
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Pirogi
 
Cookbook Recipe
Fondue à la Raymond Weill
 
Cookbook Recipe
Eggplant “Pizzas”
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Pizza
 
Cookbook Recipe
Linda’s Broccoli and Stuffing Casserole
 
Cookbook Recipe
Falafel in Pita
 
Cookbook Recipe
Tahini Sauce
 
Cookbook Recipe
Hummus
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Cottage Cheese Pancakes
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Matzo Meal Pancakes
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Blintzes
 
Cookbook Recipe
Rita’s Rice Pilaaf
 
Cookbook Recipe
Green Rice for Chicken (Rose Feldstein)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Sizzling Rice for Soup
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Kashe
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Matzo Balls for Soup (Knedlach)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Rösti (Marianne Clemenko)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Feige’s Bagellach
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Potato Kugel
 
Cookbook Recipe
Carrot-Potato Kugel
 
Cookbook Recipe
Potato Hats (“Cowboy Things for Boys”)
 
Cookbook Recipe
Gratin Dauphinois à L’Hôtel Demornex
 
Cookbook Recipe
Yvette’s Gratin Dauphinois au Fromage
 
Cookbook Recipe
Linda’s Asparagus Soup
 
Cookbook Recipe
Eggflower Sprout Soup
 
Cookbook Recipe
Rita’s Avocado Jello Salad
 
Cookbook Recipe
Lee Pinnell’s Cranberry Jello Salad
 
Cookbook Recipe
Yvette’s Yogurt Cucumber Salad
 
Cookbook Recipe
Yvette’s Flower Salad
 
Cookbook Recipe
Squash “Pasta” with Tomato-Basil Sauce
 
Cookbook Recipe
Grandma’s Carrot Ring
 
Cookbook Recipe
Sauce for Asparagus or Artichokes
 
Cookbook Recipe
Rita’s Eggplant
 
Cookbook Recipe
Carl’s Cauliflower Alfredo
 
Cookbook Recipe
JoJo’s Ratatouille
 
Cookbook Recipe
Grandma Fanny’s Apple Cake
 
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Cookbook Recipe
German Sweet Chocolate Cake (Mary Lust)

Cookbook Recipe
Chrystal’s Chocolate Torte Burgundy
This is rich!! The easiest way to grate the nuts is in a blender.

Cookbook Recipe
Hattie's Dutch Cocoa Cream Cake
Photo of Zelma Levin age 14.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother's Baking Powder Coffee Cake
Note: This also makes good cupcakes. See separate recipe for Crumb Streusel Topping. Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.

Cookbook Recipe
Crumb Streusel Topping for Cake
This is good with Mother’s Baking Powder Coffee Cake Note: May be kept in glass jar in fridge for weeks. Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother's Spanish Bun Cake
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.

Cookbook Recipe
Grandma Yetta's Crumb Cake
Picture is of Yetta Chemnick Levin (1862–1941), referred to as "Grandma" throughout this cookbook. Yetta was Zelma Levin Goldstein's (1905–1978) mother. Zelma is referred to as "mother" or "Grandma G." throughout this cookbook. Zelma was Jean Goldstein Malamud's mother. Jean is the cookbook author and recipe collector.

Cookbook Recipe
Ellen's Poppy Seed Cake
9" pans can be used, just lower the baking temperature. This is Yvette's favorite birthday cake, and Jean made it for her for many years. The trick to an excellent cake is to soak the poppy seeds in milk overnight.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother's Jello Cake
Concocted by Grandma G. on Feb. 15, 1951, for Syd's birthday. Good combinations: *Banana flavor and red coloring. *Raspberry flavor and red coloring. Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.

Cookbook Recipe
Chocolate Ithaca-Italian Fruit Cake (Pan Papato)
Mrs. Alexander was Jean & Ernie's first Ithaca landlady, and what-a-cook! Notes: Orange requires advance preparation (the night before). Make at least 2 weeks before use. A photo and some interesting history about panpepato (or pampepato) from Italian Food, Wine, & Travel by Kathy Bechtel: http://www.chefbikeski.com/?p=2675 “Pan pepato, or ‘peppered’ bread, is a fruit cake which hails from either Siena or Ferrara, depending upon the source, and you will probably find others that claim to have first produced this spicy cake … depending upon the ‘legend’, panpepato is either the predecessor or antecedent of pan forte, ‘strong’ bread. Both are fruit cakes, pan pepato (or panpepato) is flavored with black pepper and chocolate, while pan forte (or panforte) is milder, with the chocolate and pepper omitted.” “Documentation of these fruitcakes dates back to the 1200s, and shows that this type of bread was paid to Siena monasteries as a tithe. About this time, there are references to the Crusaders carrying this long-lasting sweet on their quests, to sustain them during sieges.” “In Ferrara, panpepato is served from Christmas day to Epiphany, but is traditionally offered on New Year’s Eve. In 1465, the Duke of Ferrara, Borso d’Este celebrated the feast of St. Martin with an elaborate banquet that included pan pepato with gold pieces inserted in each cake. The bakers of Ferrara then became famous for this dish, and the Ferrarese would present a panpepato to nobility and to the Pope to gain favor. As recently as World War II, the Ferrarese sent an 11 pound panpepato to General Eisenhower.”

Cookbook Recipe
Mother's Seven-Day Prune Cake
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14. This cake needs no frosting; a dusting of powdered sugar is sufficient. When dissolving baking soda in coffee: use larger than 1-cup measure to dissolve it in, because the baking soda foams up. It's called a 7-day cake because it will keep for 7 days.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Strawberry Shortcake
Many thanks to Paulette Kaleikau, who baked and photographed on the 4th of July weekend. Paulette’s comments: “Your mother’s shortbread with a little 4th of July zing. Reminded me of Chinese sponge cake. Thumbs up from both Craig & I.” Kosher (dairy)

Cookbook Recipe
Grandma Yetta’s Biscuits for Old Fashioned Shortcake
Photo of Yetta Chemnick Levin (1862–1941), Zelma’s mother.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother's Matzo-Meal Sponge Cake
Kosher for Passover. Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Fanny's Jam Cake (Mother’s Method)
This is Zelma's adaptation of Aunt Fanny's recipe. Photograph of Zelma Levin, age 14.

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Fanny's Jam Cake
Photograph of Fanny Goldstein Chemnick (1886–1955), Syd Goldstein’s sister & Grandma Goldstein’s aunt. If second batch of dough is divided into 4 parts after rolling, and then each fourth patted to meet the others, the handling is easier.

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Lilly’s Jam Cake
Photograph of Lillian Minsky Goldstein (1903–1993), Syd Goldstein’s sister-in-law.

Cookbook Recipe
Grandma Yetta's Honey Cake
Honey cake is traditional for Rosh Hoshana (Jewish New Year). Photo of Yetta Chemnick Levin (1862–1941).

Cookbook Recipe
Sally Jackson's Gourmet Banana Tea Bread
Sally Jackson was a friend From Cornell and Argonne. Photo by Elise Bauer from Simply Recipes: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/banana_bread/

Cookbook Recipe
Yvette’s Whole Wheat Pie Crust
Makes One 8” to 10” single crust OR a double crust. For white flour crust, use 1 cup white flour instead of white and wheat mixture.

Cookbook Recipe
Jean’s Simplified Pie Crust
Makes one 9” single crust or 8” to 9” double crust.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Apple Pie
Use the quantities of apples for size pie as indicated in any of your cookbooks. For the pie crust, I have always used the standard 1 part shortening to 3 parts flour and a speck of salt, but never worried about handling the dough or cutting in shortening, just use my fingers and don’t get the shortening too well blended with flour. Understand the new method of oil is very good and very easy. You might try it. I like to put some canned milk on the top crust, just spread a little with your fingers, it gives the pie a nice, brown look.

Cookbook Recipe
“Aunt Mandy’s” Rhubarb Pie
Photo from Taste of Home: http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/strawberry-rhubarb-meringue-pie/ May be kosher and/or ovo-lacto vegetarian, depending on type of shortening used.

Cookbook Recipe
Grandma Yetta’s Lemon Pie
Makes one 9" pie.

Cookbook Recipe
Grandma’s Lemon Pie (Jean’s Version)
Yield: One 9” pie.

Cookbook Recipe
Georgia Pecan Pie

Cookbook Recipe
Yvette’s Walnut Pie
More nutty and less sweet than typical pecan pie. Makes One 9” pie. An 8” or 10” pie can be made by changing the amount of nuts. Works well with Yvette's whole wheat pie crust [see separate recipe].

Cookbook Recipe
Rita’s Danish Tarts
This dough is also good for pie crust.

Cookbook Recipe
Strawberry Devonshire Tart

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Feige’s Strudel
Recipe from Aunt Feige, Rita’s older sister. Dough must be drier for strudel than for bagellach (bagellach is a potato or meat filling with this leaf). Advance preparation: Jam must be prepared the night before. Allow adequate time to prepare the strudel dough. Strudel, a type of layered pastry (usually with a sweet filling), became popular in the 18th century through the Habsburg Empire. Strudel is a traditional pastry in the whole area of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire. The oldest Strudel recipes (a Millirahmstrudel and a turnip strudel) are from 1696, in a handwritten cookbook at the Vienna City Library. The pastry descends from similar Near Eastern pastries such as baklava and Turkish pastries. Photograph of sour cherry strudel from The Taste Space: https://tastespace.wordpress.com/2010/12/

Cookbook Recipe
Pirog or Piroghi (Apple, Jam, Cabbage)
From Valia Nikitina & Irina Zolina, as argued out in our big, old-fashioned Warrenville kitchen. Our Russian visitors were all good cooks, and each had her own correct recipe. For main course, dessert, or snack. The Pirogi are eaten out of hand. The Pirog is richer and eaten with a plate and fork. Jean’s notes: Grease hands before handling dough. Use butter, not oil, to grease pan. Photo from Food Network.com: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/mushroom-apple-pierogies-recipe.html

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Feige’s Bagel
Recipe from Aunt Feige, Rita’s older sister. If egg white is beaten and added last, it will be fluffier. Aunt Feige’s recipe calls for poppy seeds, but you can also sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds or other topping.

Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Cheesecake
One of Carl Malamud’s favorite birthday cakes.

Cookbook Recipe
Cheesecake à la Sally Jackson
The cake is very good even without the toppings. The Zwieback crust was Jean’s adaptation since there were no graham crackers in Lausanne. Yvette's Note: To make kosher and/or ovo-lacto vegetarian, omit the gelatin in the recipe.

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Fanny’s Plain Cookies
Photograph of Fanny Goldstein Chemnick (1886–1955), Syd Goldstein’s sister & Grandma Goldstein’s aunt.

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Fanny’s Rolled Cookies (Rugelach)
Photograph and comments courtesy of Laurel Wickberg Bailey: "A half recipe made 30 cookies. They don't look the way Grandma's used to, her's seemed to have more dough, less filling but I followed the recipe to a T (other than halving it) and they're delicious!" Rolled cookies are also called Rugelach (רוגעלך). Rugelach is a traditional Jewish food eaten any time of the year (including Shabbat and Hannuakah). This version is kosher as it does not use milk or butter.

Cookbook Recipe
Grandma’s Oil-Butter Cookies
Photo of Yetta Chemnick Levin (1862–1941). Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Cottage Cheese Cooky Sticks
Jean’s Note: Use nuts as a base to roll on, to avoid sticking. See diagram for cutting and rolling. Kosher (dairy)

Cookbook Recipe
Jenny Wren Date and Nut Cookies
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14. Kosher (dairy)

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Mandelbrat
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.

Cookbook Recipe
Mrs. Sumter’s Ice Box Cookies
Kosher: Pareve if you use vegetable shortening, dairy if you use butter.

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Lilly’s Ice Box Cookies
Photograph of Lillian Minsky Goldstein (1903–1993), Syd Goldstein’s sister-in-law. Kosher: Pareve if you use vegetable shortening, dairy if you use butter.

Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Nutritionally Sound Peanut Butter Fudge
Start with 1/4 cup yeast to 2 cups peanut butter and work up. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Lee Pinnell’s Divinity Fudge
Yvette's notes: Better to make on a dry day. If you're not familiar with candy stages, use a candy thermometer. Photo from What’s Cooking America: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Candy/Divinity.htm

Cookbook Recipe
Rum Balls
Recipe by Judy Segol, from San Diego High School days. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Candied Orange or Grapefruit Strips
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14. You can either peel the fruit, keeping peel in quarters, or cut them in half to eat as usual, then remove whatever may remain in the skins, and cut the peel into strips. If the white pulp seems heavy, some of it can be removed, but not too much, as it is what absorbs the sugar. I prepare the peels as I get them and keep them in the freezer until I have enough for a batch. Draining the peels: I find putting them on paper towels helps to get rid of some of the excess moisture. Plain: Kosher (pareve) and vegan; chocolate-dipped: Kosher (dairy) and lacto-vegetarian.

Cookbook Recipe
Eli Läuchli’s Elderberry Sirop
Eli Läuchli is a Swiss Artist-Humanist we met in Tucson. She is currently a watercolor artist living in Winterthur, Switzerland (http://www.eli-lauchli.ch/). Zitronensäure is citric acid, also known as lemon salt or sour salt. It may be found in the baking or spice aisle at the grocery store.

Cookbook Recipe
Ron’s Glomp
Ron worked with Jean at Amoco Chemicals near Warrenville, Illinois; they shared plants & recipes before they were the ‘in’ thing. Can serve glomp over ice cream or cake. Photo from South your Mouth: http://www.southyourmouth.com/2014/01/friendship-fruit-cake-plus-starter.html

Cookbook Recipe
Garlic Vinegar
From Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf). Yield: About one quart.

Cookbook Recipe
Cucumber Vinegar
From Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf).

Cookbook Recipe
Raspberry Vinegar
Yield: About 1-1/2 quarts. Use 2 to 3 tablespoons in large glass of iced water for a cooling beverage. For flavor variation, try half-and-half mixture of raspberries and strawberries. Recipe from Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf). Photo of Sweet Raspberry Vinegar by Taste of Home: http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/sweet-raspberry-vinegar

Cookbook Recipe
Spiced Wine Vinegar
Yield: About one quart. Recipe from Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf).

Cookbook Recipe
Onion Vinegar
Recipe from Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf).

Cookbook Recipe
Fruit Filled Clouds

Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Yoghourt Ice Cream
Good made with canned applesauce (if really goopy, let drain), with apricot, banana, strawberries.

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Sarah’s Mousse au Chocolat
Recipe from Sarah Rapkine, Ernie’s Parisienne aunt. Kosher (dairy)

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Sarah’s Strawberries Romanoff
Recipe from Sarah Rapkine, Ernie’s Parisienne aunt.

Cookbook Recipe
Jean’s Sabayon
Good hot or cold. Kosher (pareve)

Cookbook Recipe
Chrystal’s Sabayon
Recipe from Chrystal Schivell, a friend from Early Warrenville days. Chrystal’s Sabayon is a lighter version than Jean’s (see separate recipe). Fold the stiffly beaten egg whites into the custard when cooked.

Cookbook Recipe
Ernie’s Baked Alaska
Cointreau and peach ice cream are good combinations. 6 egg whites give enough meringue for one large Alaska.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Noodle Pudding
Photograph of Zelma Levin around age 14 (the year she quit high school to work during the day). Photograph courtesy of Ellen Wickberg. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
“Surprise Thing” Clam Dip

Cookbook Recipe
Vegetable Pâté
Recipe from Barb Perrington of Fermilab. Yield: Serves 8 to 10. If using a blender, cook vegetables a little longer. Puree in small batches, transferring each batch to a bowl. Then mix with cheese, crumbs and seasonings. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Saganaki (Flaming Cheese)
Recipe from Petros: A Chicago Greek restaurant where there is good food, good wine and fun. Photo from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Saganaki.jpg Saganaki (σαγανάκι) refers to various Greek dishes prepared in a small frying pan, itself called a saganaki, the best-known being an appetizer of fried cheese. Cheese saganaki can be made with graviera, kefalograviera, halloumi, kasseri, kefalotyri, or sheep's milk feta cheese. Flaming saganaki apparently originated in 1968 at The Parthenon restaurant in Chicago’s Greektown (according to this Dining Chicago article: http://www.diningchicago.com/blog/2009/08/27/chicago-taste-of-greece-flies-this-weekend/ ).

Cookbook Recipe
Cheese Ribbons (Jenny Wren)
According to the Food Company Cookbooks blog, “Jenny Wren Recipes (1926, 16 pages) is a cute little pamphlet with recipes for biscuits, shortcake, dumplings, pancakes and waffles, quick breads, doughnuts, pies and cakes, cookies and other desserts.” Jenny Wren ready-made (self-rising) flour originated in Lawrence Kansas since the 1920s. The flour mill operated on the riverfront of the Kaw River in conjunction with the Bowersock Mill. Photo from: http://foodcompanycookbooks.blogspot.com/2008/02/jenny-wren-flour.html

Cookbook Recipe
Judy’s Cheese Rounds
Judy Segol was a friend from San Diego High School days. Note: Can freeze dough-covered olives to bake later. Yield: 50 hors d’oeuvres. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Stuffed Grape Leaves

Cookbook Recipe
Tranches au Fromage (Swiss grilled cheese sandwich)
Recipe from Thérèse Chevalley, an indigène of the Haute Vallais. The number of slices of bread and cheese to use depends on people’s appetites! Best combination is glutinous French bread and Gruyere cheese. You can add an egg on top, and still better a slice of ham between the bread and cheese plus the egg (poached or fried) on top of everything.

Cookbook Recipe
Stuffed Mushrooms
Mrs. Ma's Chinese Cookbook is available on Kindle through Amazon: Available on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Mrs-Chinese-Cookbook-Nancy-Chih-ebook/dp/B00B77AJ2O/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1403680423&sr=1-1

Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Version of New Joe’s Special
The name “Joe’s” was a generic name that dates back to the Barbary Coast in San Francisco. During the 1920’s, a group of entrepreneurs decided to open a new restaurant on Broadway Street in San Francisco. The name “Joe’s” had gone dormant for a while and they determined that “New Joe’s” would be a good name. “New Joe’s” became the first restaurant in San Francisco to do exhibition cooking where food was prepared in full view of the customers. It was also the restaurant where the “Joe’s Special” was created. Folklore has it that a customer ordered a spinach omelet very late one night. The customer asked the chef if he had anything else available to cook. The chef replied he had some hamburger left. The customer asked him to throw some of the hamburger into his omelet. The dish became so popular that they eventually put it on the menu. History from the Original Joe’s website: http://www.originaljoes.com/history.htm Photo from Saveur: http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Classic-Joes-Special

Cookbook Recipe
Stuffed Miltz
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14. A miltz is the cow’s spleen. The cooked texture is like a very tender liver. You can get an old, ethnic butcher to make the pocket. Miltz is not for calorie or cholesterol watchers. Kosher (meat).

Cookbook Recipe
Meat-Kasha Main Dish

Cookbook Recipe
Zel’s Brisket
Photo courtesy of Laurel Wickberg Bailey. Jean’s Notes: Cover tightly with aluminum foil for entire cooking. Start preparing the night before.

Cookbook Recipe
Pilimieni
Recipe from Valia Nikitina and Irina Zolina, Dubna wives dropped in the middle of the Illinois Prairie for a year. Russian ravioli as prepared by two very good Russian cooks. Photograh from http://ua-travelling.com/en/information/pelmeni-recipe. Could also use finely-cut cabbage for filling.

Cookbook Recipe
Piroshki
Recipe from Tamara Pilipienko & Elena Morosova, more Russian wives who came to our very foreign country. Our Russian visitors made a seemingly endless number of these “Little Pies”—actually rolls with a sweet or savory filling. Jean’s Note: Grease hands before handling dough. Use butter, not oil, to grease pan. Tamara does not let rise again after filling. She brushes with butter when done, and puts a towel over the piroshki. Photograph from http://tanjaskitchen.wordpress.com/tag/piroshki-recipe/

Cookbook Recipe
Meatballs
Thanks so much to Yvette’s sister-in-law Lisa Herrinton for cooking and photographing the meatballs! Lisa suggests browning the meatballs before adding them to the tomato sauce.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Breast of Lamb
Photo of Zelma at age 14.

Cookbook Recipe
Rita’s Beef Strogonoff

Cookbook Recipe
Baked Fish à la Aunt Sarah
Recipe from Sarah Rapkine, Ernie’s Parisienne aunt. Photograph of Sarah in 1990.

Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Sauce for fish

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Gefilte Fish
Photograph of Zelma at age 14. To allow thickening, can also cook longer after the fish is out, or add a little plain gelatin. Kosher (pareve), unless you use gelatin. Kosher for Passover if you use matzo crumbs instead of bread.

Cookbook Recipe
Grandma’s Marinated Herring
Yvette's Note: Herring milt or miltz (מילטז) is the soft roe of the herring. Kosher (pareve).

Cookbook Recipe
Boeuf Fondue Bourguignonne
Jean’s Notes: Remind guests that cooking forks are not for eating. They get hot. I use peanut oil. Heat oil on the stove before bringing to table. Round steak (one-inch cubes) is a good meat to use.

Cookbook Recipe
Carl’s Cabbage Cream Pie

Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Pirogi

Cookbook Recipe
Fondue à la Raymond Weill
Raymond Weill: The Lausanne Physicist who started our world travels by inviting Ernie to work at the École Polytechnique. Don’t lose the bread in the pot or you owe a bottle of wine! Preferred cheese is genuine Swiss gruyere; you can mix with a certain amount of Emmenthal (genuine Swiss if possible). Dry white wine: use Villette or Feudaul. In USA Almaden, pinot blanc, or chablis will be okay.

Cookbook Recipe
Eggplant “Pizzas”
Photograph from Kalyn's Kitchen: http://www.kalynskitchen.com/2012/08/recipe-for-julia-childs-eggplant-pizzas.html Yvette's Notes: A long, thin eggplant (female) is preferable to a short, rounder eggplant (male). The female eggplant has more, smaller seeds; the male eggplant bas larger, fewer seeds, and a more bitter taste. Male eggplants tend to have less of an indentation on the vine stem end than the females. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Pizza

Cookbook Recipe
Linda’s Broccoli and Stuffing Casserole
Recipe from Linda Pearson: A fellow Amoco Chemicals technician

Cookbook Recipe
Falafel in Pita
Suggestion: Serve with pickle strips. See separate recipes for Tahini Sauce and Hummus.

Cookbook Recipe
Tahini Sauce
Good with Falafel. See separate recipes for Hummus and Falafel.

Cookbook Recipe
Hummus
Good as a dip with pita chips or fresh veggies, or as a spread on sandwiches. Adapted from recipes learned from Israeli visitors to Illinois in the 1970s. See separate recipes for Falafel and Tahini.

Cookbook Recipe
Ellen’s Cottage Cheese Pancakes
Kosher (dairy)

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Matzo Meal Pancakes
Photo of Zelma, age 14. Good for Passover.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Blintzes
Recipe makes about 18 blini leaves and fills about 14 blintzes. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Rita’s Rice Pilaaf

Cookbook Recipe
Green Rice for Chicken (Rose Feldstein)

Cookbook Recipe
Sizzling Rice for Soup
When the liquid is poured onto the rice, the absorption makes an interesting sound. Combine the two at the table, right before serving, to amuse your guests.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Kashe
Photograph of Zelma Levin, age 14. Some people like to serve it in place of rice or noodles in soup. May be kosher and/or vegetarian, depending on what type of fat you use.

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Matzo Balls for Soup (Knedlach)
Photograph of Zelma Levin, age 14. Good for Passover. Kosher (meat).

Cookbook Recipe
Rösti (Marianne Clemenko)
Rösti are Swiss hash browns. Boil potatoes 2 or 3 days before use.

Cookbook Recipe
Aunt Feige’s Bagellach
Aunt Feige was Rita’s older sister Dough is not quite as dry as for Strudel. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Mother’s Potato Kugel
As potatoes are shredded, add to egg mixture so they won’t turn green. Can bake in well-greased muffin tins—takes a little less time. May be vegetarian and/or kosher, depending what type of fat you use.

Cookbook Recipe
Carrot-Potato Kugel
Baking time: 40 minutes in oven or 10 to 11 minutes in microwave.

Cookbook Recipe
Potato Hats (“Cowboy Things for Boys”)
Eli Läuchli is a Swiss Artist-Humanist we met in Tucson. She is currently a watercolor artist living in Winterthur, Switzerland (http://www.eli-lauchli.ch/).

Cookbook Recipe
Gratin Dauphinois à L’Hôtel Demornex
Potatoes should come only to 3/4” from top of dish, or milk will boil over. Keep it shallow so it bakes fast. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Yvette’s Gratin Dauphinois au Fromage
Photo courtesy of Janet Ashford, who used home-grown garlic and potatoes! Best if two or more types of cheese are used in combination. Can try other combinations of cheeses. Potatoes should come only to ¾” from top of dish, or milk will boil over. Keep it shallow so it bakes fast.

Cookbook Recipe
Linda’s Asparagus Soup
Recipe from Linda Pearson: A fellow Amoco Chemicals technician. If using fresh asparagus, use 3/4 C water to each pound of asparagus to cook. Kosher (dairy)

Cookbook Recipe
Eggflower Sprout Soup

Cookbook Recipe
Rita’s Avocado Jello Salad

Cookbook Recipe
Lee Pinnell’s Cranberry Jello Salad

Cookbook Recipe
Yvette’s Yogurt Cucumber Salad
Finely mince the cucumbers to serve as a dip, like raita, or as a cooling topping. Use thicker slices or cubes of cucumber for salad. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Yvette’s Flower Salad
Dressing: I prefer a vinaigrette or a garlic mayonnaise. To keep the flowers and lettuce from wilting, don’t toss the salad with the dressing beforehand: allow people to add their own dressing. The flowers are edible. Kosher (pareve or dairy) and vegetarian (ovo-lacto or vegan), depending on dressing and optional ingredients.

Cookbook Recipe
Squash “Pasta” with Tomato-Basil Sauce
Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Grandma’s Carrot Ring
Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
Sauce for Asparagus or Artichokes
Aunt Sarah got this recipe from Baron Rothschild's Chef.

Cookbook Recipe
Rita’s Eggplant
Yvette's Notes: Using the "barbeque" (stove-top) cooking method imparts a slightly charred, smoky flavor to the eggplant. Keeps in refrigerator for 3 to 5 days. Kosher (pareve)

Cookbook Recipe
Carl’s Cauliflower Alfredo
Yields about 2 cups sauce. Kosher (dairy).

Cookbook Recipe
JoJo’s Ratatouille
Recipe from JoJo Joseph: From Lausanne, Switzerland, cooks like her Southern French upbringing. Good warm or cold. Kosher (pareve).

Cookbook Recipe
Grandma Fanny’s Apple Cake
A 2014 addition to the cookbook. Recipe from Adryenn Cantor (Fanny’s granddaughter). “When it was cut it was a slice of apple cake, which has a lot of apples as the filling. Delicious!” Photograph of Fanny Goldstein Chemnick (1886–1955), Syd Goldstein’s sister & Grandma Goldstein’s aunt. May be kosher and ovo-lacto vegetarian, depending on what type of shortening is used.

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German Sweet Chocolate Cake (Mary Lust)
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg


Chrystal’s Chocolate Torte Burgundy
Submitted by: Chrystal Schivell
This is rich!! The easiest way to grate the nuts is in a blender.


Hattie's Dutch Cocoa Cream Cake
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photo of Zelma Levin age 14.


Mother's Baking Powder Coffee Cake
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Note: This also makes good cupcakes. See separate recipe for Crumb Streusel Topping. Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.


Crumb Streusel Topping for Cake
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
This is good with Mother’s Baking Powder Coffee Cake Note: May be kept in glass jar in fridge for weeks. Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.


Mother's Spanish Bun Cake
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.


Grandma Yetta's Crumb Cake
Submitted by: Yetta Chemnick Levin
Picture is of Yetta Chemnick Levin (1862–1941), referred to as "Grandma" throughout this cookbook. Yetta was Zelma Levin Goldstein's (1905–1978) mother. Zelma is referred to as "mother" or "Grandma G." throughout this cookbook. Zelma was Jean Goldstein Malamud's mother. Jean is the cookbook author and recipe collector.


Ellen's Poppy Seed Cake
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg
9" pans can be used, just lower the baking temperature. This is Yvette's favorite birthday cake, and Jean made it for her for many years. The trick to an excellent cake is to soak the poppy seeds in milk overnight.


Mother's Jello Cake
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Concocted by Grandma G. on Feb. 15, 1951, for Syd's birthday. Good combinations: *Banana flavor and red coloring. *Raspberry flavor and red coloring. Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.


Chocolate Ithaca-Italian Fruit Cake (Pan Papato)
Submitted by: Mrs. Alexander
Mrs. Alexander was Jean & Ernie's first Ithaca landlady, and what-a-cook! Notes: Orange requires advance preparation (the night before). Make at least 2 weeks before use. A photo and some interesting history about panpepato (or pampepato) from Italian Food, Wine, & Travel by Kathy Bechtel: http://www.chefbikeski.com/?p=2675 “Pan pepato, or ‘peppered’ bread, is a fruit cake which hails from either Siena or Ferrara, depending upon the source, and you will probably find others that claim to have first produced this spicy cake … depending upon the ‘legend’, panpepato is either the predecessor or antecedent of pan forte, ‘strong’ bread. Both are fruit cakes, pan pepato (or panpepato) is flavored with black pepper and chocolate, while pan forte (or panforte) is milder, with the chocolate and pepper omitted.” “Documentation of these fruitcakes dates back to the 1200s, and shows that this type of bread was paid to Siena monasteries as a tithe. About this time, there are references to the Crusaders carrying this long-lasting sweet on their quests, to sustain them during sieges.” “In Ferrara, panpepato is served from Christmas day to Epiphany, but is traditionally offered on New Year’s Eve. In 1465, the Duke of Ferrara, Borso d’Este celebrated the feast of St. Martin with an elaborate banquet that included pan pepato with gold pieces inserted in each cake. The bakers of Ferrara then became famous for this dish, and the Ferrarese would present a panpepato to nobility and to the Pope to gain favor. As recently as World War II, the Ferrarese sent an 11 pound panpepato to General Eisenhower.”


Mother's Seven-Day Prune Cake
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14. This cake needs no frosting; a dusting of powdered sugar is sufficient. When dissolving baking soda in coffee: use larger than 1-cup measure to dissolve it in, because the baking soda foams up. It's called a 7-day cake because it will keep for 7 days.


Mother’s Strawberry Shortcake
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Many thanks to Paulette Kaleikau, who baked and photographed on the 4th of July weekend. Paulette’s comments: “Your mother’s shortbread with a little 4th of July zing. Reminded me of Chinese sponge cake. Thumbs up from both Craig & I.” Kosher (dairy)


Grandma Yetta’s Biscuits for Old Fashioned Shortcake
Submitted by: Yetta Chemnick Levin
Photo of Yetta Chemnick Levin (1862–1941), Zelma’s mother.


Mother's Matzo-Meal Sponge Cake
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Kosher for Passover. Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.


Aunt Fanny's Jam Cake (Mother’s Method)
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein, Fanny Goldstein Chemnick
This is Zelma's adaptation of Aunt Fanny's recipe. Photograph of Zelma Levin, age 14.


Aunt Fanny's Jam Cake
Submitted by: Fanny Goldstein Chemnick
Photograph of Fanny Goldstein Chemnick (1886–1955), Syd Goldstein’s sister & Grandma Goldstein’s aunt. If second batch of dough is divided into 4 parts after rolling, and then each fourth patted to meet the others, the handling is easier.


Aunt Lilly’s Jam Cake
Submitted by: Lillian Minsky Goldstein
Photograph of Lillian Minsky Goldstein (1903–1993), Syd Goldstein’s sister-in-law.


Grandma Yetta's Honey Cake
Submitted by: Yetta Chemnick Levin
Honey cake is traditional for Rosh Hoshana (Jewish New Year). Photo of Yetta Chemnick Levin (1862–1941).


Sally Jackson's Gourmet Banana Tea Bread
Submitted by: Sally Jackson
Sally Jackson was a friend From Cornell and Argonne. Photo by Elise Bauer from Simply Recipes: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/banana_bread/


Yvette’s Whole Wheat Pie Crust
Submitted by: Yvette Malamud Ozer
Makes One 8” to 10” single crust OR a double crust. For white flour crust, use 1 cup white flour instead of white and wheat mixture.


Jean’s Simplified Pie Crust
Submitted by: Jean Goldstein Malamud
Makes one 9” single crust or 8” to 9” double crust.


Mother’s Apple Pie
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Use the quantities of apples for size pie as indicated in any of your cookbooks. For the pie crust, I have always used the standard 1 part shortening to 3 parts flour and a speck of salt, but never worried about handling the dough or cutting in shortening, just use my fingers and don’t get the shortening too well blended with flour. Understand the new method of oil is very good and very easy. You might try it. I like to put some canned milk on the top crust, just spread a little with your fingers, it gives the pie a nice, brown look.


“Aunt Mandy’s” Rhubarb Pie
Submitted by: Connie Lynch
Photo from Taste of Home: http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/strawberry-rhubarb-meringue-pie/ May be kosher and/or ovo-lacto vegetarian, depending on type of shortening used.


Grandma Yetta’s Lemon Pie
Submitted by: Yetta Chemnick Levin
Makes one 9" pie.


Grandma’s Lemon Pie (Jean’s Version)
Submitted by: Jean Goldstein Malamud, Yetta Chemnick Levin
Yield: One 9” pie.


Georgia Pecan Pie
Submitted by: Parade Magazine


Yvette’s Walnut Pie
Submitted by: Yvette Malamud Ozer
More nutty and less sweet than typical pecan pie. Makes One 9” pie. An 8” or 10” pie can be made by changing the amount of nuts. Works well with Yvette's whole wheat pie crust [see separate recipe].


Rita’s Danish Tarts
Submitted by: Rita Kayser Malamud
This dough is also good for pie crust.


Strawberry Devonshire Tart
Submitted by: Rita Kayser Malamud


Aunt Feige’s Strudel
Submitted by: Aunt Feige
Recipe from Aunt Feige, Rita’s older sister. Dough must be drier for strudel than for bagellach (bagellach is a potato or meat filling with this leaf). Advance preparation: Jam must be prepared the night before. Allow adequate time to prepare the strudel dough. Strudel, a type of layered pastry (usually with a sweet filling), became popular in the 18th century through the Habsburg Empire. Strudel is a traditional pastry in the whole area of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire. The oldest Strudel recipes (a Millirahmstrudel and a turnip strudel) are from 1696, in a handwritten cookbook at the Vienna City Library. The pastry descends from similar Near Eastern pastries such as baklava and Turkish pastries. Photograph of sour cherry strudel from The Taste Space: https://tastespace.wordpress.com/2010/12/


Pirog or Piroghi (Apple, Jam, Cabbage)
Submitted by: Valia Nikitina & Irina Zolina
From Valia Nikitina & Irina Zolina, as argued out in our big, old-fashioned Warrenville kitchen. Our Russian visitors were all good cooks, and each had her own correct recipe. For main course, dessert, or snack. The Pirogi are eaten out of hand. The Pirog is richer and eaten with a plate and fork. Jean’s notes: Grease hands before handling dough. Use butter, not oil, to grease pan. Photo from Food Network.com: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/mushroom-apple-pierogies-recipe.html


Aunt Feige’s Bagel
Submitted by: Aunt Feige
Recipe from Aunt Feige, Rita’s older sister. If egg white is beaten and added last, it will be fluffier. Aunt Feige’s recipe calls for poppy seeds, but you can also sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds or other topping.


Ellen’s Cheesecake
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg
One of Carl Malamud’s favorite birthday cakes.


Cheesecake à la Sally Jackson
Submitted by: Sally Jackson
The cake is very good even without the toppings. The Zwieback crust was Jean’s adaptation since there were no graham crackers in Lausanne. Yvette's Note: To make kosher and/or ovo-lacto vegetarian, omit the gelatin in the recipe.


Aunt Fanny’s Plain Cookies
Submitted by: Fanny Goldstein Chemnick
Photograph of Fanny Goldstein Chemnick (1886–1955), Syd Goldstein’s sister & Grandma Goldstein’s aunt.


Aunt Fanny’s Rolled Cookies (Rugelach)
Submitted by: Fanny Goldstein Chemnick
Photograph and comments courtesy of Laurel Wickberg Bailey: "A half recipe made 30 cookies. They don't look the way Grandma's used to, her's seemed to have more dough, less filling but I followed the recipe to a T (other than halving it) and they're delicious!" Rolled cookies are also called Rugelach (רוגעלך). Rugelach is a traditional Jewish food eaten any time of the year (including Shabbat and Hannuakah). This version is kosher as it does not use milk or butter.


Grandma’s Oil-Butter Cookies
Submitted by: Yetta Chemnick Levin
Photo of Yetta Chemnick Levin (1862–1941). Kosher (dairy).


Cottage Cheese Cooky Sticks
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Jean’s Note: Use nuts as a base to roll on, to avoid sticking. See diagram for cutting and rolling. Kosher (dairy)


Jenny Wren Date and Nut Cookies
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14. Kosher (dairy)


Mother’s Mandelbrat
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14.


Mrs. Sumter’s Ice Box Cookies
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Kosher: Pareve if you use vegetable shortening, dairy if you use butter.


Aunt Lilly’s Ice Box Cookies
Submitted by: Lillian Minsky Goldstein
Photograph of Lillian Minsky Goldstein (1903–1993), Syd Goldstein’s sister-in-law. Kosher: Pareve if you use vegetable shortening, dairy if you use butter.


Ellen’s Nutritionally Sound Peanut Butter Fudge
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg
Start with 1/4 cup yeast to 2 cups peanut butter and work up. Kosher (dairy).


Lee Pinnell’s Divinity Fudge
Submitted by: Lee Pinnell
Yvette's notes: Better to make on a dry day. If you're not familiar with candy stages, use a candy thermometer. Photo from What’s Cooking America: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Candy/Divinity.htm


Rum Balls
Submitted by: Judy Segol
Recipe by Judy Segol, from San Diego High School days. Kosher (dairy).


Mother’s Candied Orange or Grapefruit Strips
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14. You can either peel the fruit, keeping peel in quarters, or cut them in half to eat as usual, then remove whatever may remain in the skins, and cut the peel into strips. If the white pulp seems heavy, some of it can be removed, but not too much, as it is what absorbs the sugar. I prepare the peels as I get them and keep them in the freezer until I have enough for a batch. Draining the peels: I find putting them on paper towels helps to get rid of some of the excess moisture. Plain: Kosher (pareve) and vegan; chocolate-dipped: Kosher (dairy) and lacto-vegetarian.


Eli Läuchli’s Elderberry Sirop
Submitted by: Eli Läuchli
Eli Läuchli is a Swiss Artist-Humanist we met in Tucson. She is currently a watercolor artist living in Winterthur, Switzerland (http://www.eli-lauchli.ch/). Zitronensäure is citric acid, also known as lemon salt or sour salt. It may be found in the baking or spice aisle at the grocery store.


Ron’s Glomp
Submitted by: Ron
Ron worked with Jean at Amoco Chemicals near Warrenville, Illinois; they shared plants & recipes before they were the ‘in’ thing. Can serve glomp over ice cream or cake. Photo from South your Mouth: http://www.southyourmouth.com/2014/01/friendship-fruit-cake-plus-starter.html


Garlic Vinegar
Submitted by: Jean Lesem
From Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf). Yield: About one quart.


Cucumber Vinegar
Submitted by: Jean Lesem
From Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf).


Raspberry Vinegar
Submitted by: Jean Lesem
Yield: About 1-1/2 quarts. Use 2 to 3 tablespoons in large glass of iced water for a cooling beverage. For flavor variation, try half-and-half mixture of raspberries and strawberries. Recipe from Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf). Photo of Sweet Raspberry Vinegar by Taste of Home: http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/sweet-raspberry-vinegar


Spiced Wine Vinegar
Submitted by: Jean Lesem
Yield: About one quart. Recipe from Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf).


Onion Vinegar
Submitted by: Jean Lesem
Recipe from Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf).


Fruit Filled Clouds


Ellen’s Yoghourt Ice Cream
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg
Good made with canned applesauce (if really goopy, let drain), with apricot, banana, strawberries.


Aunt Sarah’s Mousse au Chocolat
Submitted by: Sarah Rapkine
Recipe from Sarah Rapkine, Ernie’s Parisienne aunt. Kosher (dairy)


Aunt Sarah’s Strawberries Romanoff
Submitted by: Sarah Rapkine
Recipe from Sarah Rapkine, Ernie’s Parisienne aunt.


Jean’s Sabayon
Submitted by: Jean Goldstein Malamud
Good hot or cold. Kosher (pareve)


Chrystal’s Sabayon
Submitted by: Chrystal Schivell
Recipe from Chrystal Schivell, a friend from Early Warrenville days. Chrystal’s Sabayon is a lighter version than Jean’s (see separate recipe). Fold the stiffly beaten egg whites into the custard when cooked.


Ernie’s Baked Alaska
Submitted by: Ernie Malamud
Cointreau and peach ice cream are good combinations. 6 egg whites give enough meringue for one large Alaska.


Mother’s Noodle Pudding
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photograph of Zelma Levin around age 14 (the year she quit high school to work during the day). Photograph courtesy of Ellen Wickberg. Kosher (dairy).


“Surprise Thing” Clam Dip
Submitted by: Carl Malamud


Vegetable Pâté
Submitted by: Barb Perrington
Recipe from Barb Perrington of Fermilab. Yield: Serves 8 to 10. If using a blender, cook vegetables a little longer. Puree in small batches, transferring each batch to a bowl. Then mix with cheese, crumbs and seasonings. Kosher (dairy).


Saganaki (Flaming Cheese)
Submitted by: Petros
Recipe from Petros: A Chicago Greek restaurant where there is good food, good wine and fun. Photo from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Saganaki.jpg Saganaki (σαγανάκι) refers to various Greek dishes prepared in a small frying pan, itself called a saganaki, the best-known being an appetizer of fried cheese. Cheese saganaki can be made with graviera, kefalograviera, halloumi, kasseri, kefalotyri, or sheep's milk feta cheese. Flaming saganaki apparently originated in 1968 at The Parthenon restaurant in Chicago’s Greektown (according to this Dining Chicago article: http://www.diningchicago.com/blog/2009/08/27/chicago-taste-of-greece-flies-this-weekend/ ).


Cheese Ribbons (Jenny Wren)
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
According to the Food Company Cookbooks blog, “Jenny Wren Recipes (1926, 16 pages) is a cute little pamphlet with recipes for biscuits, shortcake, dumplings, pancakes and waffles, quick breads, doughnuts, pies and cakes, cookies and other desserts.” Jenny Wren ready-made (self-rising) flour originated in Lawrence Kansas since the 1920s. The flour mill operated on the riverfront of the Kaw River in conjunction with the Bowersock Mill. Photo from: http://foodcompanycookbooks.blogspot.com/2008/02/jenny-wren-flour.html


Judy’s Cheese Rounds
Submitted by: Judy Segol
Judy Segol was a friend from San Diego High School days. Note: Can freeze dough-covered olives to bake later. Yield: 50 hors d’oeuvres. Kosher (dairy).


Stuffed Grape Leaves
Submitted by: Jean Goldstein Malamud


Tranches au Fromage (Swiss grilled cheese sandwich)
Submitted by: Thérèse Chevalley
Recipe from Thérèse Chevalley, an indigène of the Haute Vallais. The number of slices of bread and cheese to use depends on people’s appetites! Best combination is glutinous French bread and Gruyere cheese. You can add an egg on top, and still better a slice of ham between the bread and cheese plus the egg (poached or fried) on top of everything.


Stuffed Mushrooms
Submitted by: Mrs. Ma’s Cookbook
Mrs. Ma's Chinese Cookbook is available on Kindle through Amazon: Available on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Mrs-Chinese-Cookbook-Nancy-Chih-ebook/dp/B00B77AJ2O/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1403680423&sr=1-1


Ellen’s Version of New Joe’s Special
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg/Sunset Magazine
The name “Joe’s” was a generic name that dates back to the Barbary Coast in San Francisco. During the 1920’s, a group of entrepreneurs decided to open a new restaurant on Broadway Street in San Francisco. The name “Joe’s” had gone dormant for a while and they determined that “New Joe’s” would be a good name. “New Joe’s” became the first restaurant in San Francisco to do exhibition cooking where food was prepared in full view of the customers. It was also the restaurant where the “Joe’s Special” was created. Folklore has it that a customer ordered a spinach omelet very late one night. The customer asked the chef if he had anything else available to cook. The chef replied he had some hamburger left. The customer asked him to throw some of the hamburger into his omelet. The dish became so popular that they eventually put it on the menu. History from the Original Joe’s website: http://www.originaljoes.com/history.htm Photo from Saveur: http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Classic-Joes-Special


Stuffed Miltz
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photo of Zelma Levin, age 14. A miltz is the cow’s spleen. The cooked texture is like a very tender liver. You can get an old, ethnic butcher to make the pocket. Miltz is not for calorie or cholesterol watchers. Kosher (meat).


Meat-Kasha Main Dish
Submitted by: Jean Goldstein Malamud


Zel’s Brisket
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photo courtesy of Laurel Wickberg Bailey. Jean’s Notes: Cover tightly with aluminum foil for entire cooking. Start preparing the night before.


Pilimieni
Submitted by: Valia Nikitina & Irina Zolina
Recipe from Valia Nikitina and Irina Zolina, Dubna wives dropped in the middle of the Illinois Prairie for a year. Russian ravioli as prepared by two very good Russian cooks. Photograh from http://ua-travelling.com/en/information/pelmeni-recipe. Could also use finely-cut cabbage for filling.


Piroshki
Submitted by: Tamara Pilipienko & Elena Morosova
Recipe from Tamara Pilipienko & Elena Morosova, more Russian wives who came to our very foreign country. Our Russian visitors made a seemingly endless number of these “Little Pies”—actually rolls with a sweet or savory filling. Jean’s Note: Grease hands before handling dough. Use butter, not oil, to grease pan. Tamara does not let rise again after filling. She brushes with butter when done, and puts a towel over the piroshki. Photograph from http://tanjaskitchen.wordpress.com/tag/piroshki-recipe/


Meatballs
Submitted by: Jean Goldstein Malamud
Thanks so much to Yvette’s sister-in-law Lisa Herrinton for cooking and photographing the meatballs! Lisa suggests browning the meatballs before adding them to the tomato sauce.


Mother’s Breast of Lamb
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photo of Zelma at age 14.


Rita’s Beef Strogonoff
Submitted by: Rita Kayser Malamud


Baked Fish à la Aunt Sarah
Submitted by: Sarah Rapkine
Recipe from Sarah Rapkine, Ernie’s Parisienne aunt. Photograph of Sarah in 1990.


Ellen’s Sauce for fish
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg


Mother’s Gefilte Fish
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photograph of Zelma at age 14. To allow thickening, can also cook longer after the fish is out, or add a little plain gelatin. Kosher (pareve), unless you use gelatin. Kosher for Passover if you use matzo crumbs instead of bread.


Grandma’s Marinated Herring
Submitted by: Yetta Chemnick Levin
Yvette's Note: Herring milt or miltz (מילטז) is the soft roe of the herring. Kosher (pareve).


Boeuf Fondue Bourguignonne
Submitted by: Jean Goldstein Malamud
Jean’s Notes: Remind guests that cooking forks are not for eating. They get hot. I use peanut oil. Heat oil on the stove before bringing to table. Round steak (one-inch cubes) is a good meat to use.


Carl’s Cabbage Cream Pie
Submitted by: Carl Malamud


Ellen’s Pirogi
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg


Fondue à la Raymond Weill
Submitted by: Raymond Weill
Raymond Weill: The Lausanne Physicist who started our world travels by inviting Ernie to work at the École Polytechnique. Don’t lose the bread in the pot or you owe a bottle of wine! Preferred cheese is genuine Swiss gruyere; you can mix with a certain amount of Emmenthal (genuine Swiss if possible). Dry white wine: use Villette or Feudaul. In USA Almaden, pinot blanc, or chablis will be okay.


Eggplant “Pizzas”
Submitted by: Julia Child via Yvette Malamud Ozer
Photograph from Kalyn's Kitchen: http://www.kalynskitchen.com/2012/08/recipe-for-julia-childs-eggplant-pizzas.html Yvette's Notes: A long, thin eggplant (female) is preferable to a short, rounder eggplant (male). The female eggplant has more, smaller seeds; the male eggplant bas larger, fewer seeds, and a more bitter taste. Male eggplants tend to have less of an indentation on the vine stem end than the females. Kosher (dairy).


Ellen’s Pizza
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg


Linda’s Broccoli and Stuffing Casserole
Submitted by: Linda Pearson
Recipe from Linda Pearson: A fellow Amoco Chemicals technician


Falafel in Pita
Submitted by: Yvette Malamud Ozer
Suggestion: Serve with pickle strips. See separate recipes for Tahini Sauce and Hummus.


Tahini Sauce
Submitted by: Yvette Malamud Ozer
Good with Falafel. See separate recipes for Hummus and Falafel.


Hummus
Submitted by: Yvette Malamud Ozer
Good as a dip with pita chips or fresh veggies, or as a spread on sandwiches. Adapted from recipes learned from Israeli visitors to Illinois in the 1970s. See separate recipes for Falafel and Tahini.


Ellen’s Cottage Cheese Pancakes
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg
Kosher (dairy)


Mother’s Matzo Meal Pancakes
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photo of Zelma, age 14. Good for Passover.


Mother’s Blintzes
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Recipe makes about 18 blini leaves and fills about 14 blintzes. Kosher (dairy).


Rita’s Rice Pilaaf
Submitted by: Rita Kayser Malamud


Green Rice for Chicken (Rose Feldstein)
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein


Sizzling Rice for Soup
Submitted by: Jean Goldstein Malamud
When the liquid is poured onto the rice, the absorption makes an interesting sound. Combine the two at the table, right before serving, to amuse your guests.


Mother’s Kashe
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photograph of Zelma Levin, age 14. Some people like to serve it in place of rice or noodles in soup. May be kosher and/or vegetarian, depending on what type of fat you use.


Mother’s Matzo Balls for Soup (Knedlach)
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Photograph of Zelma Levin, age 14. Good for Passover. Kosher (meat).


Rösti (Marianne Clemenko)
Submitted by: Ellen Goldstein Wickberg
Rösti are Swiss hash browns. Boil potatoes 2 or 3 days before use.


Aunt Feige’s Bagellach
Submitted by: Aunt Feige
Aunt Feige was Rita’s older sister Dough is not quite as dry as for Strudel. Kosher (dairy).


Mother’s Potato Kugel
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
As potatoes are shredded, add to egg mixture so they won’t turn green. Can bake in well-greased muffin tins—takes a little less time. May be vegetarian and/or kosher, depending what type of fat you use.


Carrot-Potato Kugel
Submitted by: Zelma Levin Goldstein
Baking time: 40 minutes in oven or 10 to 11 minutes in microwave.


Potato Hats (“Cowboy Things for Boys”)
Submitted by: Eli Läuchli
Eli Läuchli is a Swiss Artist-Humanist we met in Tucson. She is currently a watercolor artist living in Winterthur, Switzerland (http://www.eli-lauchli.ch/).


Gratin Dauphinois à L’Hôtel Demornex
Submitted by: Hôtel Demornex
Potatoes should come only to 3/4” from top of dish, or milk will boil over. Keep it shallow so it bakes fast. Kosher (dairy).


Yvette’s Gratin Dauphinois au Fromage
Submitted by: Yvette Malamud Ozer
Photo courtesy of Janet Ashford, who used home-grown garlic and potatoes! Best if two or more types of cheese are used in combination. Can try other combinations of cheeses. Potatoes should come only to ¾” from top of dish, or milk will boil over. Keep it shallow so it bakes fast.


Linda’s Asparagus Soup
Submitted by: Linda Pearson
Recipe from Linda Pearson: A fellow Amoco Chemicals technician. If using fresh asparagus, use 3/4 C water to each pound of asparagus to cook. Kosher (dairy)


Eggflower Sprout Soup
Submitted by: Jean Goldstein Malamud


Rita’s Avocado Jello Salad
Submitted by: Rita Kayser Malamud


Lee Pinnell’s Cranberry Jello Salad
Submitted by: Lee Pinnell


Yvette’s Yogurt Cucumber Salad
Submitted by: Yvette Malamud Ozer
Finely mince the cucumbers to serve as a dip, like raita, or as a cooling topping. Use thicker slices or cubes of cucumber for salad. Kosher (dairy).


Yvette’s Flower Salad
Submitted by: Yvette Malamud Ozer
Dressing: I prefer a vinaigrette or a garlic mayonnaise. To keep the flowers and lettuce from wilting, don’t toss the salad with the dressing beforehand: allow people to add their own dressing. The flowers are edible. Kosher (pareve or dairy) and vegetarian (ovo-lacto or vegan), depending on dressing and optional ingredients.


Squash “Pasta” with Tomato-Basil Sauce
Submitted by: Jean Goldstein Malamud
Kosher (dairy).


Grandma’s Carrot Ring
Submitted by: Yetta Chemnick Levin
Kosher (dairy).


Sauce for Asparagus or Artichokes
Submitted by: Sarah Rapkine via Baron Rothschild
Aunt Sarah got this recipe from Baron Rothschild's Chef.


Rita’s Eggplant
Submitted by: Rita Kayser Malamud
Yvette's Notes: Using the "barbeque" (stove-top) cooking method imparts a slightly charred, smoky flavor to the eggplant. Keeps in refrigerator for 3 to 5 days. Kosher (pareve)


Carl’s Cauliflower Alfredo
Submitted by: Carl Malamud
Yields about 2 cups sauce. Kosher (dairy).


JoJo’s Ratatouille
Submitted by: JoJo Joseph
Recipe from JoJo Joseph: From Lausanne, Switzerland, cooks like her Southern French upbringing. Good warm or cold. Kosher (pareve).


Grandma Fanny’s Apple Cake
Submitted by: Aunt Fanny (via Adryenn Cantor)
A 2014 addition to the cookbook. Recipe from Adryenn Cantor (Fanny’s granddaughter). “When it was cut it was a slice of apple cake, which has a lot of apples as the filling. Delicious!” Photograph of Fanny Goldstein Chemnick (1886–1955), Syd Goldstein’s sister & Grandma Goldstein’s aunt. May be kosher and ovo-lacto vegetarian, depending on what type of shortening is used.


The recipes in this book were collected by Jean Goldstein Malamud from 1954 to 1981. They were compiled into a cookbook in 1985 by Jean and her daughter Yvette Malamud Ozer.

Recipes come from family, friends, co-workers, neighbors, and other sources (e.g., restaurants, magazines, and cookbooks). Many thanks to Eric Wickberg (one of Ellen’s sons) for helping provide photographs and accurate information about various Goldstein family members.

Contributors include:

• Jean Goldstein Malamud: The collector

• Mother (Grandma G.): Zelma Levin Goldstein (1905–1978), Jean’s mother, married to Syd C. Goldstein

• Grandma (Yetta): Yetta Chemnick Levin (1862–1941), Zelma’s mother

• Ellen Goldstein Wickberg: Jean’s sister

• Aunt Fanny: Fanny Goldstein Chemnick (1886–1955), Syd Goldstein’s sister & Grandma G’s aunt

• Aunt Lilly: Lillian Minsky Goldstein (1903–1993), Syd Goldstein’s sister-in-law

• Ernie Malamud, Jean’s ex-husband

• Rita: Rita Kayser Malamud, Ernie’s mother

• Aunt Sarah: Sarah Rapkine, Ernie’s Parisienne aunt

• Aunt Feige: Rita’s older sister

• Carl Malamud: Jean and Ernie’s first son

• Yvette Malamud Ozer: Jean and Ernie’s daughter (the compiler)

• Mrs. Alexander: Our first Ithaca landlady, and what-a-cook!

• Thérèse Chevalley: Indigène of the Haute Vallais

• Sally Jackson: From Cornell and Argonne

• JoJo Joseph: From Lausanne, Switzerland, cooks like her Southern French upbringing

• Eli Läuchli: A Swiss Artist-Humanist met in Tucson

• Valia Nikitina & Irina Zolina: Dubna wives dropped in the middle of the Illinois Prairie for a year

• Tamara Pilipienko & Elena Morosova: More Russian wives who came to our very foreign country

• Linda Pearson: A fellow Amoco Chemicals technician

• Barb Perrington: Of Fermilab

• Petros: A Chicago Greek restaurant where there is good food, good wine and fun.

• Lee Pinnell

• Ron: Of Amoco Chemicals, who shared plants & recipes before they were the ‘in’ thing

• Chrystal Schivell: Early Warrenville days

• Judy Segol: From San Diego High School days

• Raymond Weill: The Lausanne Physicist who started our world travels by inviting Ernie to work at the École Polytechnique

• Julia Child

• Hôtel Demornex: Province of AIN, France—A one-star restaurant in a one-half horse town near Geneva

• From Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf)

• Connie Lynch

• Mrs. Ma’s Cookbook

• Parade Magazine

• Sunset Magazine

Cover photograph (left to right): Zelma Levin Goldstein, Jean Goldstein Malamud, Uncle Hyman Chemnick (?), Aunt Goldie Goldstein, Aunt Lilly Goldstein and Aunt Fannie Chemnick. Probably sometime in the early 1950s.

cruzlorenzo
on Jul/11/2017
Looks so great, I hope there are many great recipes)))

Cookbook Recipe
Jean’s Recipe File

FREE

The recipes in this book were collected by Jean Goldstein Malamud from 1954 to 1981. They were compiled into a cookbook in 1985 by Jean and her daughter Yvette Malamud Ozer. Recipes come from family, friends, co-workers, neighbors, and other sources (e.g., restaurants, magazines, and cookbooks). Many thanks to Eric Wickberg (one of Ellen’s sons) for helping provide photographs and accurate information about various Goldstein family members. Contributors include: • Jean Goldstein Malamud: The collector • Mother (Grandma G.): Zelma Levin Goldstein (1905–1978), Jean’s mother, married to Syd C. Goldstein • Grandma (Yetta): Yetta Chemnick Levin (1862–1941), Zelma’s mother • Ellen Goldstein Wickberg: Jean’s sister • Aunt Fanny: Fanny Goldstein Chemnick (1886–1955), Syd Goldstein’s sister & Grandma G’s aunt • Aunt Lilly: Lillian Minsky Goldstein (1903–1993), Syd Goldstein’s sister-in-law • Ernie Malamud, Jean’s ex-husband • Rita: Rita Kayser Malamud, Ernie’s mother • Aunt Sarah: Sarah Rapkine, Ernie’s Parisienne aunt • Aunt Feige: Rita’s older sister • Carl Malamud: Jean and Ernie’s first son • Yvette Malamud Ozer: Jean and Ernie’s daughter (the compiler) • Mrs. Alexander: Our first Ithaca landlady, and what-a-cook! • Thérèse Chevalley: Indigène of the Haute Vallais • Sally Jackson: From Cornell and Argonne • JoJo Joseph: From Lausanne, Switzerland, cooks like her Southern French upbringing • Eli Läuchli: A Swiss Artist-Humanist met in Tucson • Valia Nikitina & Irina Zolina: Dubna wives dropped in the middle of the Illinois Prairie for a year • Tamara Pilipienko & Elena Morosova: More Russian wives who came to our very foreign country • Linda Pearson: A fellow Amoco Chemicals technician • Barb Perrington: Of Fermilab • Petros: A Chicago Greek restaurant where there is good food, good wine and fun. • Lee Pinnell • Ron: Of Amoco Chemicals, who shared plants & recipes before they were the ‘in’ thing • Chrystal Schivell: Early Warrenville days • Judy Segol: From San Diego High School days • Raymond Weill: The Lausanne Physicist who started our world travels by inviting Ernie to work at the École Polytechnique • Julia Child • Hôtel Demornex: Province of AIN, France—A one-star restaurant in a one-half horse town near Geneva • From Jean Lesem’s The Pleasures of Preserving and Pickling (Alfred A. Knopf) • Connie Lynch • Mrs. Ma’s Cookbook • Parade Magazine • Sunset Magazine Cover photograph (left to right): Zelma Levin Goldstein, Jean Goldstein Malamud, Uncle Hyman Chemnick (?), Aunt Goldie Goldstein, Aunt Lilly Goldstein and Aunt Fannie Chemnick. Probably sometime in the early 1950s.