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Recipes for Vitality


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Recipes for Vitality
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Cookbook Recipes
Cookbook Recipe
Garden Patch Omelet with Coconut Oil
 
Cookbook Recipe
Purple Grape Granita with Green Tea
 
Cookbook Recipe
Snackalicious Banana
 
Cookbook Recipe
Javanana Power Shake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Instant Vegetable Soup Puree
 
Cookbook Recipe
Kale Chips
 
Cookbook Recipe
Tomato Turkey Stack
 
Cookbook Recipe
Berry Blast
 

Cookbook Recipe
Garden Patch Omelet with Coconut Oil
A study that appeared in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association shows that among young adults the healthiest eaters are those who frequently prepare their meals at home, rather than eating out. Researchers at the University of Minnesota studied 764 men and 946 women aged 18 - 23. The ones who reported making their own meals at home were more likely to meet dietary guidelines for fat, calcium, fruit, vegetables and whole grains. 31 percent of those who prepared their food at home ate five daily servings of fruits and vegetables, compared with three percent who said they rarely prepared their own food.

Cookbook Recipe
Purple Grape Granita with Green Tea
Green Tea for Heart Health Here's good news: If you've gotten on the "green tea" bandwagon and you're enjoying your daily dose of green tea...up the dose to five cups a day and you're on your way to improved cardiovascular health, according to a study from Japan. Tea is the second most popular drink in the world after water.

Cookbook Recipe
Snackalicious Banana
Power in its Own Little Package: According to the Chiquita Bananas company, bananas are the world’s most popular fruit - we eat more bananas than apples and oranges combined. In fact, the average American eats 27 pounds of bananas every year. Here are more interesting banana facts from Chiquita Bananas (http://www.chiquitabananas.com/): The American Heart Association has certified bananas as a heart-healthy food when eaten as part of a low-fat balanced diet. Although many factors contribute to heart health, bananas are a good source of potassium, essential to the health of your heart and nervous system. Potassium is needed for proper muscle contraction and your heart is the hardest working muscle in your body. Bananas include tryptophan, an amino acid that helps your body produce serotonin, a natural substance that has a calming effect on the brain and can act as a gentle sedative. The vitamin B6, which regulates blood glucose levels, can also have a positive effect on your mood. Bananas also have high levels of natural vitamin B6, which helps your body produce hemoglobin, a critical component in blood. Plus, B6 helps your body's immune system and antibody production. And it enables your body to convert carbohydrates to glucose to maintain the correct blood sugar level. Bananas are also a good source of manganese, a powerful antioxidant that aids in regulating blood sugar levels.

Cookbook Recipe
Javanana Power Shake
Coffee Keeps Getting Better and Better Just when you thought the news about coffee couldn't get any better, it does! A while back, the "experts" told us that “coffee has more antioxidants than any food or drink in the American diet.” (http://tinyurl.com/44sx6x5) Well, now it seems an unknown ingredient in coffee, when combined with caffeine, stimulates blood levels of a critical protein called GCSF - short for granulocyte-colony stimulating factor - that appears to put off the development of Alzheimer’s disease. According to a team from the University of South Florida (USF), co-led by Dr. Chuanhai Cao, a neuroscientist at USF and reported in an online edition of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, "Caffeinated coffee provides a natural increase in blood GCSF levels." "The exact way that this occurs is not understood. There is a synergistic interaction between caffeine and some mystery component of coffee that provides this beneficial increase in blood GCSF levels," said Cao.

Cookbook Recipe
Instant Vegetable Soup Puree
What is Organic? Most people have heard by now that organic food is healthier, but what exactly does that word "organic" mean on our food labels? It's the term used to describe raw or processed agricultural products and ingredients that have been organically grown and handled in compliance with the USDA national standards of April, 2001. These standards prohibit the use of:

 • Most synthetic fertilizers and pesticides • Genetic engineering • Sewer sludge fertilizers • Growth hormones • Antibiotics • Irradiation • Artificial ingredients So, when you see the word "organic" on your food label, you can be sure that they meet these strict standards established in 2001 for organic foods.

Cookbook Recipe
Kale Chips
Keeping an Eye on Veggies Everyone knows that carrots are especially good for your eyes, right? The nutrient lutein — which is found in small amounts in carrots — has been shown to reduce the severity of the age-related eye disease macular degeneration (one of the top causes of vision loss). It turns out, though, that broccoli, spinach and other green leafy vegetables are much better sources of lutein than carrots! Just another reason to eat a wide variety of vegetables and fruit.

Cookbook Recipe
Tomato Turkey Stack
Talking Turkey: Most of you already know that turkey is an excellent source of protein (a four ounce serving provides 65 percent of the daily value for protein), but did you also know that turkey is a good source of cancer-preventive selenium? Selenium is an essential component of several major metabolic pathways, including thyroid hormone metabolism, antioxidant defense systems and immune function. Selenium has been shown to induce DNA repair and synthesis in damaged cells, inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and rev up the self-destruct sequence the body uses to eliminate worn out or abnormal cells. Just four ounces of turkey provides 47 percent of the recommended daily dose of selenium. B6 is an important vitamin present in turkey as well as niacin, another cancer preventing nutrient, according to scientists. Niacin is essential for converting the body's proteins, fats and carbohydrates into usable energy and helps optimize blood sugar regulation and insulin activity. Vitamin B6 is needed for more for 100 enzymes involved in protein metabolism. It's also essential for red blood cell metabolism and for the proper function of our nervous and immune systems. So, even if your eyes glazed over from all that scientific mumbo jumbo, you can rest assured that your body and your taste buds will enjoy this next recipe.

Cookbook Recipe
Berry Blast
What’s That Fuzzy Thing in the Fridge? Ever wonder whether that opened jar of tomato sauce or mayonnaise in your fridge is still usable? The expiration dates pertain to the unopened product. Here's a list of common foods and approximately how long they last in the fridge after opening -- Pasta Sauce: Tomato-based sauces are good for only about five days to a week after opening. Even if you don't see mold in the sauce, it could actually be in there. No amount of cooking will kill the toxins in mold, so it's best to discard the sauce. Mayonnaise: With its high fat content, mayo is susceptible to mold and bacteria growth, but it can last about two months in the fridge once it's been opened. Cheese: Depending on the type of cheese, whether it's hard or soft, it can last one to four weeks in the fridge. Softer cheeses, like Brie, have a shorter shelf life than hard cheeses, like Cheddar. To prolong the shelf life of cheese, take it out of the plastic it comes in, wrap in wax paper and then a layer of plastic wrap and keep refrigerated. Eggs: Eggs can last three to five weeks in the fridge. Keep them in the coldest part of the fridge, usually the back. Keeping eggs in the door, where some manufacturers put those "egg shelves" will cause them to spoil more quickly. Leftovers:
Most leftovers can last three to four days in the fridge. If you have a large amount of leftover hot food, divide it into smaller portions in separate containers in the fridge to ensure that the middle cools down properly.

Getting older may be beyond our control, but how we age is not. Aging Backwards is not about denying age nor the changes that accompany aging. It is about incorporating subtle changes into your life that are within almost anyone’s capacity to make. It’s about working with what you’ve got and making a commitment to improving yourself a little bit every single day.

But if you do miss a day or you feel like eating that big slice of cake “just this once,” so what? Aging Backwards is not about beating yourself up. It’s about focusing on the good things you do and doing more of them, more often. Lots of little accomplishments add up to big results and the rewards are great.

Nutrition contributes greatly to health and vitality and it's easier than you think to "crave" foods that are good for you when they taste delicious. In this cookbook, you'll find recipes that could help start you on the road to Aging Backwards.

Life should be an adventure, and adventures are always best when you approach them with an open, optimistic mind. As I like to say, it’s never too late — or even too early — to start thinking about Aging Backwards.

So, let’s turn back the clock - and get cooking - together!

Please read: The entire contents of this book are based upon the opinions of Jackie Silver, unless otherwise noted, and for educational purposes only. The information and products mentioned in this book are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease, are not intended as medical advice, and not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional, such as a doctor, for when you need one. Be sure to check with your doctor before engaging in any dietary or fitness changes or routines.

©2011 Jackie Silver

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or by any information storage or retrieval system without written permission from Jackie Silver except by a reviewer who wishes to quote brief passages in connection with a review written for inclusion in a magazine, newspaper, video, broadcast or online publication.

Aging Backwards is a trademark and is protected by the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

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Recipes for Vitality

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