BakeSpace.com Member Forums
Welcome to the BakeSpace.com forums. Please email us at babette@bakespace.com once you have register so that we may quickly activate your forum account. Please provide us with your username so we can find your account. Thank you!
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Growing Herbs- Chart
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    BakeSpace.com Member Forums Forum Index -> Home, Garden & Pets
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ddpie
Elite BakeSpacer


Joined: 18 Jul 2007
Posts: 8618

PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 6:23 am    Post subject: Growing Herbs- Chart Reply with quote

I've had this guide for several years, but I can't remember where I found it. I have it in a Word file that I did for a printed cookbook I've been working on. The original file contains pictures if anyone is interested, I added the page below to give you an idea of how the pages look. Just pm me and I can send the Word file to you. I didn't have time today to resize the pages to post, but here is all of the info:

Oh, I should mention that I'm in zone 5 (Indiana), so some of the "annuals" of course are "perinnials" in other zones.

Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) serves a dual purpose in cuisine. The foliage is called cilantro or Chinese parsley, and the seeds are called coriander. The latter is a staple in many curries. All parts are edible. Plant in full sun in well-drained soil. Cilantro gets 18 inches tall and 12 inches wide. Harvest when the plant is about 30 days old. Uses: Mexican, Asian and Indian foods.

Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) probably is the one herb everyone recognizes. The most common is the curly-leaf, but cooks agree that the most flavorful is the flat-leaf, or Italian parsley. Plant in full sun in well-drained soil rich in organic matter. Parsley tolerates light shade. Plants get about 20 inches tall and wide. Parsley is a biennial, forming leaves, called a rosette, during year one and flowers in year two. Most people grow it as an annual. Harvest once plant is 6 inches tall. Leave about 1 inch of the stem on the plant when snipping. Uses: Parsley adds color and flavor in soups, salads and main courses. Eat it raw to clean the palate or use as a garnish.

Dill (Anethum graveolens) is a food source for caterpillars, butterflies and humans. Stems, flowers and seeds of this annual are used in cooking. It self-sows and may pop up elsewhere in the landscape. Plant in full sun in well-drained soil. Sow seeds every week to 10 days. Dill will get about 3 feet tall and 18 inches wide, so plant in the middle or back of the garden bed. It is fast-growing, but weak-stemmed and will lean on neighboring plants. Harvest the leaves before dill flowers; in late summer, as flowers start to produce seeds, remove seed heads and place in a paper bag. Seeds will fall out when ripe. Uses: Salads, soups, sauces, dips, fish, breads, pickling.


Basil (Occimum basilicum) is a frost-tender annual that has beautiful flowers as well as large, tasty leaves. Very aromatic with lots of flavorful cultivars to choose from, including cinnamon and lemon. Some varieties have ruffled purple leaves. May attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Plant in full sun and rich, well-drained soil. Basil gets about 20 inches tall and 12 to 15 inches wide. It is extremely sensitive to cold. Harvest by pruning about every two weeks. Make sure to leave enough stems and leaves on the plant to ensure production. Uses: Mediterranean and Indian dishes, salads and pesto sauces.


Thyme (Thymus serphyllum), also called mother of thyme, frequently serves as a fragrant, edible, semi-evergreen ground cover in rock gardens, between stepping-stones or at the front of the perennial border. Lemon thyme (T. vulgaris) and woolly thyme (T. praecox articus) are also popular varieties. Thyme attracts butterflies. Plant in full sun in well-drained soil. Avoid spots that stay wet or cold. Thyme gets 3 to 6 inches tall and will spread about 3 feet. It has pink flowers. Harvest when the plant is 3 inches tall by snipping off stems. Strip leaves from woody stems. Uses: Thyme enhances the flavor of meats, salads and sauces.


Garlic is simple and easy to grow. Plant garlic cloves in the fall, and you will harvest garlic bulbs in late spring. Plant it in just about any slightly rich soil, in a partly to mostly sunny location. It can even be grown amidst your flower garden, near roses to ward off aphids and Japanese Beetles. It's odor wards off many insects. However, on occasion, maggots will be a problem. Harvest after the tops have fallen over and dried. (Although you can begin to pick them as soon as a bulb starts to form.). Wash them off ,and leave them to dry in the sun for a day or two. You can weave the stalks into a braid and hang them for future use. Or, you can cut the stalk off and store them in a cool, dry place. Properly stored, it will keep over the winter months. Garlic leaves are flat, while onion and chive leaves are round. Uses: as a spice, flavoring or a vegetable.
From Jen in Michigan: you plant it in the fall, cover with a light mulch, in the spring time uncover and let grow. When you start to see flowers on top, you'll want to cut so that you get a bigger bulb. Continue growing until around the middle of July or when you start seeing the plant browning. Stop watering 2-3 weeks before harvest as the garlic will get moldy.


Chives (Allium schoenoprasum) do great in the perennial or herb garden or in a pot on the windowsill or porch. Easy to grow from seed, they self-sow somewhat, so pinching off (and eating) the flowers keeps these perennials in check. Plant in full sun to part shade in well-drained, average soil. Chives grow in small clumps, getting 10 to 12 inches tall. Harvest anytime. Cut leaves to about 2 inches from the ground. Uses: As a garnish and flavoring in foods such as omelets, potatoes or salads.


Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is as much at home in the perennial flower garden as in the herb bed. A woody, shrubby plant with aromatic silver-gray foliage, lavender has blue, white or pale pink flowers in early summer that are excellent when cut for indoor arrangements, fresh or dried. French lavender (L. dentata) and Spanish lavender (L. stoechas) are not winter-hardy in Indiana. Lavendin (Lavandula x intermedia) is grown for its oils, is taller than common lavender and is winter-hardy in Indiana. Plant in full sun with average, well-drained soil that is more dry than wet. Poor drainage is death. Lavender will get 12 to 24 inches tall and wide. Cut back to the ground in early spring. Harvest by cutting stems to the base of the plant. Leave some stems on the plant during winter. Uses: Desserts, vegetables and drinks.


Tarragon (estragon), Tarragon grows to 2 to 5 feet, depending upon variety. The aromatic leaves are thin and blade-like, with a pointed tip. It produces drooping flowers in mid summer. Being native to prairies, and rocky, barren environments, Tarragon will make it's home in the poorest area of your garden. Plant in full sun, in dry, rocky or gravel or sandy soil. Harvest and dry the leaves and flowers. Store them in a cool, dry place. Can also be kept in the freezer. Tarragon is best known for flavoring vinegar. Uses: salads, meats, vegetables, and sauces, mayonnaise, cheese, and omelettes. It also helps to take the fishy taste out of fish. Used in making Dijon Mustard.


Mint are hardy perennial plants, and they are very easy to grow. Bushy plants with white, blue or pink flowers. Once planted, mints will come back year, after year. Most varieties grow 12-24 inches. Plant in sun or partial shade. They will do well in average soils, withstand droughts, and heat very well. Fertilizer is not usually required, except in the poorest of soils. Mints are aggressive growers, crowding out other plants if given the chance. Harvest leaves at any time. They can be used fresh, dried, or frozen. Pick them in the morning when the oils are strongest. Spread leaves out to dry in a cool and ventilated area. Once dried, store it in an air-tight container, away from other herbs. The mint family includes Marjoram, Rosemary, Oregano and Sage.

Marjoram is a very close relative of Oregano, and is a member of the Mint family. It thrives in dry, arid regions, and it grows two to four feet. Plant in full sun and a well drained soil. They will do well in average soils, and tolerate dry soil conditions. Water them during dry periods, once every week or two. Do not add fertilizer to this plant, and it will produce stronger flavor. Pick flower bulbs as soon as they appear. The leaves turn bitter after flowers bloom. Harvest leaves at any time after the plant has produced a few dozen leaves. Pick the young, tender leaves as they are best for flavor.

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a stunning evergreen that has beautiful purple flowers in December. An aromatic, tender woody plant, it is not winter-hardy in Indiana, so many people bring it indoors for safe keeping. Plant in full sun and well-drained, evenly moist soil; do not let rosemary dry out. Most gardeners grow rosemary in a pot so it can be taken indoors when temperatures fall and back outside in spring. Give it as much light as possible indoors. In an ideal setting, it may get 3 to 5 feet tall. It also can be grown as a topiary. Harvest by snipping branches back to the main trunk. Strip pinelike needles (leaves) from stem. Uses: Meats, sauces, breads and vegetables.

Oregano plants are closely related to Marjoram.Thriving in dry, arid regions. It grows two to four feet. Plant in full sun, and a well drained soil. They will do well in average soils, and tolerate dry soil conditions. Will withstand droughts very well. Water them during dry periods, once every week or two. Do not add fertilizer to this plant, and it will produce a stronger flavor. Pick flower buds as soon as they appear. The leaves turn bitter after flowers bloom. Harvest leaves at any time after the plant has produced a few dozen leaves. Pick the young, tender leaves, as they are best for flavor. Pick them in the morning when the oils are strongest. Spread leaves out to dry in a cool and ventilated area. Leaves can also be put in the freezer. Uses: meats, stews, vegetables, sauces (Italian cooking).


Sage (Salvia officinalis) is in the same family as popular annual and perennial garden plants. The bumpy, silvery-green leaves on this woody perennial turn gray in winter. The purple and variegated-leaf varieties are less winter-hardy. Sage cont’d- Attracts butterflies. Plant in full sun in well-drained soil; wet soil is a killer. Sage gets 21/2 feet tall and wide. Blue flowers are great for cutting. Cut back in half after it flowers. Replace plants when they start to look ratty, usually after three years. Harvest leaves any time. Uses: Stuffing, salads, meat/egg dishes.

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ddpie
Elite BakeSpacer


Joined: 18 Jul 2007
Posts: 8618

PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, I forgot....

I've grown everyone of these to date (except for garlic) I've grown them indoors and out. So if anyone in my region has questions, I may be able to help (or at least share my screw ups LOL)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CulinaryAlchemist
Pro BakeSpacer


Joined: 07 Aug 2007
Posts: 7975
Location: The Wilds of Oregon; It's Awesome

PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Awesome!!! Thanks DD
_________________
~ Shane


http://bakespace.com/?culinaryalchemist
http://www.twitter.com/CulinaryAlchemy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
ddpie
Elite BakeSpacer


Joined: 18 Jul 2007
Posts: 8618

PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 6:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

yw Smile

If you or anyone has stuff to add about different regions, just let me know and I'll add it up above. That way it will be easier for people to refer to or copy Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dutchmom4
Pro Chef


Joined: 12 Oct 2006
Posts: 3340
Location: Michigan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, DD! Can't wait to get started.

~~Vicki
_________________


http://bakespace.com/?dutchmom4
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pattit
Pro BakeSpacer


Joined: 25 Nov 2006
Posts: 6156
Location: Central PA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am in zone 6, but most if not all info sounds the same for me. Thanks for a great resource!
_________________
Patti
http://bakespace.com/?Pattit



http://photostosharewithbakespace.shutterfly.com/pictures
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dutchmom4
Pro Chef


Joined: 12 Oct 2006
Posts: 3340
Location: Michigan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2010 7:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bump for 2010
_________________


http://bakespace.com/?dutchmom4
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ImStuffed
Over 10,000 Posts Club


Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 13761
Location: Burbank

PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2010 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

haha...I thought this was someething she posted today....it says thursday but I didn't pay attention to the date. And some how I missed this post last year! Thanks for bumping it. The info is great about the herbs. all I have to do is adapt it to my zone (I think its 24 or something, I forget)
_________________
Danielle
"Sometimes your knight in shining armor is just a re-tard in tin foil"

My Recipes: http://bakespace.com/?imstuffed
My Food Blog: http://peacefulcooking.blogspot.com/
My Fun Blog: http://letsridethebus.blogspot.com/
My Twitter: http://twitter.com/imstuffed
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gigi421
Pro Chef


Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 3320
Location: City of Champions

PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2010 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought DD was back with us too......................miss her Sad
_________________
Karen
http://www.bakespace.com/?gigi[/img]421
http://www.bakespace.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=7307


"People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ImStuffed
Over 10,000 Posts Club


Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 13761
Location: Burbank

PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2010 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know...I miss them all...DD, Joy, Michele, Mary...etc etc.
_________________
Danielle
"Sometimes your knight in shining armor is just a re-tard in tin foil"

My Recipes: http://bakespace.com/?imstuffed
My Food Blog: http://peacefulcooking.blogspot.com/
My Fun Blog: http://letsridethebus.blogspot.com/
My Twitter: http://twitter.com/imstuffed
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    BakeSpace.com Member Forums Forum Index -> Home, Garden & Pets All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
               
About Us Recipes Join Now Connect

BakeSpace.com is the grassroots online community where you can share recipes, build new friendships, learn from other home chefs and express your passion for all things food-related.

About Us

Contact Us

FAQ

Press Room

As a BakeSpace member you can post, search and swap recipes in real-time, and our unique recipe swap feature ensures that you'll always know what youre friends are cooking.


New Recipes

All Recipe Categories

My Recipe Box

Joining BakeSpace is quick, easy and free! Once you become a member you can start swapping recipes and connecting with other foodies immediately.

Sign Up

Invite Friends

Facebook Join our Facebook Fan Page for surpise giveaways!
Twitter Follow us on Twitter for Daily Cooking Tips from our founder.
Pinterest Follow us on Pinterest and check out what we're pinning today!
 
Awards

Cookbook Cafe

Cookbook Cafe is a do-it-yourself digital publishing platform that enables anyone to create, market and sell their very own cookbook to the world for profit or fundraising.With our easy-to-use cookbook builder, you can publish your own beautifully interactive cookbook as both a Web-based eBook and iPad App. The builder also makes it easy to crowdsource recipes and include content from family members, friends and co-workers -- whether they're in the next room or halfway around the globe.

CookBook Builder

New Cookbooks

Non-Profit Cookbooks

Cookbook Partners

Search Cookbooks

Webby
2012IACP Awards Nominated for "Most Intriguing Use of New Technology"
2011Webby Honoree "Community"
2011Webby Honoree "Lifestyle"
2011Webby Honoree "Social Media"
2010Webby Nominee "Best Social Network"
2010GIT Catalyst Conference "Top 5 Best Female Owned Companies"
2009Webby Nominee "Best Social Network"
2009Twiistup Conference Finalist
2008Webby Honoree "Best Social Network"
2007Webby Honoree "Best Social Network"
  © 2006−Present BakeSpace, Inc. All Rights Reserved.