HERRHEXENMEISTER'S MENTOR PROFILE

Hi, I'm herrhexenmeister.

I'm a mentor in Tea, Tofu

I'm from Ogden, Utah

Check out my website http://tomhamilton.blogspot.com


View my Profile | View my Recipes

My Tea Corner

Experience:
Tea, like coffee, is an art form, though I don't take it super serious, myself. I just want a good, quality cup.


Biggest Lesson Learned:
The likes of Lipton can never match the flavor and aroma of quality tea. Be it bagged or loose leaf, there are many good options and brands out there.


My Tips:

  • To brew green tea, heat you water to boiling, then remove it from the heat. Let it sit for about 10 to 20 seconds before pouring over the tea leaves. Brew from no more than 3 minutes.
  • Soy milk works woderfully in tea, but add it after the brewing and don't boil it. I've found that boiling soy milk gives it a grainy texture.

My Tofu Corner

Why I want to be mentor in this category:
I have tried many a recipe with tofu, I have had great successes, and stunning failures (my family still won't touch the stuff after my first attempt, which turned into what texturally resembled a sort of chili jell-o than tacos). These mistakes have hel


What inspires me in this category:
I used to weight a scale-breaking 220 lbs, after changing to a healthy diet and starting to exercise, I'm more at 145 lbs and am even training to run the Zeitgeist Half-Marathon. Tofu, and its other soy cousins, have helped me to stay healthy and energet


Experience:
Being a flexitarian (~ 90% vegetarian) and someone who runs and likes to lift weights, I am often in search of affordable, easy-to-use, and flexible sources of non-animal protein. Time and again tofu has been the answer. It's a blank canvas, just waitin


Biggest Lesson Learned:
Tofu comes in many kinds of firmness, from the gelatinous silken tofu (which is perfect for cream pies, shakes, making creamy soups and dressings), to medium, firm, and super firm (which are better if you want something with more textural *oomph.*


Books, classes, teachers that have helped me:
"101 Things to Do With Tofu" by Donna Kelly and Anne Tegtmeier "Student's Vegetarian Cookbook" by Carol Raymond


Education, Awards, Pro Experience:
Personal experience and a willingness to try new, unexpected, and often weird ideas. As Ms. Frizzle said, "Take chances, get messy, and make mistakes!"

My Tips:

  • The can even freeze, then thaw, then press tofu for an evem meatier texture.
  • If you want tofu to be at its firmest, for salads, etc, you have to drain it of as much water as you can. Cut your slab in half, thickness-wise, and put them between some paper towels with a plate and a weight on top. Let it drain 20 - 30 minutes.

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