OH MY APPLE PIE

 

  • Cooking Time:
  • Servings: 8-10
  • Preparation Time:

Ingredients

  • 1 recipe basic pie dough
  • 2 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting the work surface
  • 3 large Granny Smith apples (1 1/2 pounds)
  • 4 large McIntosh apples ( about 2 pounds)
  • 1 tablespoon juice and 1 teaspoon grated zest from 1 lemon)
  • 3/4 cups (5 1/4 ounces) plus 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg white, beaten slightly
  • Basic Pie Dough:
  • For 1 double-crust 9-inch pies
  • 2 1/2 cups (12 1/2 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting the work surface.
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 cup vegetable shorting, chilled
  • 12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/4 inch pieces
  • 6-8 tablespoons ice water
  • 1. Process the flour, slat and sugar in a food processor until combined. Add shortening and process until the mixture has the texture of corse sand, about 10 seconds. Scatter the butter pieces over the flour mixture; cut the butter into the flour until the mixture is pale yellow and resembles course crumbs, with butter bits no larger than small peas, about ten 1-second pulses. Turn the mixture into a medium bowl.
  • 2. Sprinkle 6 tablespoons of the ice water over the mixture. With a rubber spatula, use a folding motion to mix. Press down on the dough with the broad side of the spatula until the dough sticks together, adding up to 2 tablespoons more ice water if the dough will not come together. Divide the dough into 2 balls and flatten each into a 4-inch disk. Wrap each in plastic and refrigerate at least 1 hour, or up to 2 days, before rolling.

Directions

  • Pie:
  • 1. Adjust an oven rack to the lowest position, place a rimmed baking sheet on it, and heat the oven to 500˚ degrees. Remove one pieces of dough from the refrigerator (of refrigerated longer than 1 hour, let stand at room temperature until malleable.)
  • 2. Roll the dough on a lightly floured work surface between 2 large sheets of parchment paper or plastic wrap to a 12-inch circle. Transfer the dough to a 9-inch pie plate by rolling the dough around the rolling pin and unrolling over the pan. Working around the circumference of the pan, ease the dough into the pan corners by gently lifting the edge of the dough with one hand while pressing into the pan with the other hand. Leave any dough that overhangs the lip of the pie plate in place: refrigerate the dough-lined pie plate.
  • 3. Peel, core and quarter the apples: cut the quarters into 1/4-inch slices and toss with lemon juice and zest. In a medium bowl, mix 3/4 cup of the sugar, the flour, spices and salt. Toss the dry ingredients with the apples. Turn the fruit mixture, including juices, into the chilled pie shell and mound it slightly in the center.
  • 4. Roll out the second piece of dough to a 12-inch circle: place it over the filling. Trim the edges of the top and bottom dough layers to 1/2 inch beyond the pan lip. Tuck the rim of dough underneath itself so the folded edge is flush with the pan lip. Flute the edge or press with fork tines to seal. Cut 4 slits in the dough top. If the pie dough is very soft, place the pie in the freezer for 10 minutes. Brush the egg white on the top crust and sprinkle evenly with the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar. I used Penzeys Vanilla Sugar.
  • Note: A double-crust apple pie is the quintessential American pie, but rarely do its looks match its flavor. Too often, the pie is marred by crumbling edges, a cracked top and uneven borders, even before it goes into the oven. For an attractive pie, the top crust should be draped, not stretched across the top, and the bottom and top crusts must be sealed together to prevent juices from escaping. A clean crimping of the edge is the finishing touch. Nice straight slits, evenly spaced across the top crust, allow steam to escape and prevent a soupy filling: they also provide an attractive decoration.
  • 5. Place the pie on the baking sheet and lower the oven temperature to 425˚ degrees. Bake the pie until the top crust is golden, about 25 minutes. Rotate the pie from front to back and reduce the oven temperature to 375˚ degrees; continue baking until the juices bubble and the crust is deep golden brown, 30 to 35 minutes longer.
  • 6. Transfer the pie to a wire rack; cool to room temperature, at least 4 hours.
  • If you want to spice up your pie, try these variations:
  • Add 3 tablespoons chopped crystallized ginger to the apple mix
  • or
  • Macerate 1 cup raisins, dried sweet cherries, or dried cranberries in the lemon juice, adding 1 tablespoon applejack, brandy or cognac. Add into the apple mix
  • or
  • Increase the sugar to 1 cup (7 oz) and adding 1 cup fresh or frozen cranberries to the apple mixture.
  • or
  • Add in 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract and 1/2 teaspoon of almond extract to the apple mixture.
  • Pie Dough
  • 1. Process the flour, slat and sugar in a food processor until combined. Add shortening and process until the mixture has the texture of corse sand, about 10 seconds. Scatter the butter pieces over the flour mixture; cut the butter into the flour until the mixture is pale yellow and resembles course crumbs, with butter bits no larger than small peas, about ten 1-second pulses. Turn the mixture into a medium bowl.
  • 2. Sprinkle 6 tablespoons of the ice water over the mixture. With a rubber spatula, use a folding motion to mix. Press down on the dough with the broad side of the spatula until the dough sticks together, adding up to 2 tablespoons more ice water if the dough will not come together. Divide the dough into 2 balls and flatten each into a 4-inch disk. Wrap each in plastic and refrigerate at least 1 hour, or up to 2 days, before rolling.
  • Rolling and Fitting Pie Dough
  • Using a tapered pin, roll a quarter turn, from 2 o'clock to 5 o'clock keeping your left hand stationary and moving the pin with your right hand.
  • Turn the dough a quarter turn and roll again as in step 1. Continue rolling the dough s 8 or 9 inches in diameter.
  • Using a bench scraper, life the dough onto the rolling pin, pick it up and re-flour the counter, and replace the dough upside down. Keep rolling until the diameter of the dough is 4 inches wider than the pie plate.
  • Roll the doug over the pin and unroll it evenly onto the pie plate.
  • After draping the dough evenly over the pie plate, life up the edges of the dough and ease it down into the lower creases of the pan. Press lightly to adhere the dough to the sides of the pan. Or you can use the pre-made pie dough like me!

Notes

I love fall! Growing up we would visit the Purdue Apple Farm and pick our own apples. Apples back then tasted different, thicker skins, juicy sweet white with red and green bits, and the apples tasted more like cider than store bought apples. I recently had (for the 1st time in many years) a Purdue apple, it was exactly the same!!!

I remember that when Josh and I were very very young, Mom would take us with to listen to the Purdue Marching Band practices (check out the videos) We had a picnic blanket and we would all spread out with fresh apples and snacks and listen to the music. Sometime we even brought our dog, Molly, with us to picnic. I don't know that she liked it as much as Josh and I did. I remember these picnics, the beautiful fall days and the amazing music as one of my most cherished memories with my mom and brother.

Despite the fact that apple pie was not really present in my childhood, eating apple pie reminds me of these days. We spent many afternoons in the shade of trees, listening to amazing fun, upbeat music and eating fresh apples. Happy Fall-ing in Love with Fall!

Author Credit: Baking Illustrated

Website Credit: http://www.not-just-vanilla.com/2009/11/apple-pie-oh-my.html

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