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Coursera Nutrition  for Health Promotion Global Recipe Book
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Coursera Nutrition for Health Promotion Global Recipe Book


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This ebook is a compilation of recipes built by members of a Facebook group who completed a 6 week course through Coursera (a MOOC free learning environment) in July 2013, called Nutrition for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.

An assignment asked members to upload a photo and recipe of a dish that had cultural or personal meaning to them; a dish that was traditionally said to have healing properties or be a healthful dish. The assignment asked the course members to analyse the nutrition of their chosen dish. As the group has members across the globe, we thought it would be good to compile these dishes into an ebook to share with each other and the world.

Happy healthy eating. Bon appetit!

This ebook is a compilation of recipes built by members of a Facebook group who completed a 6 week course through Coursera (a MOOC free learning environment) in July 2013, called Nutrition for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.

An assignment asked members to upload a photo and recipe of a dish that had cultural or personal meaning to them; a dish that was traditionally said to have healing properties or be a healthful dish. The assignment asked the course members to analyse the nutrition of their chosen dish. As the group has members across the globe, we thought it would be good to compile these dishes into an ebook to share with each other and the world.

Happy healthy eating. Bon appetit!
...Show less

Cookbook Recipes
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Cookbook Recipe
Raine's Vegetarian Guernsey Bean Jar
 
Cookbook Recipe
Hummus
 
Cookbook Recipe
arroz caldo
 
Cookbook Recipe
Green papaya and pork soup
 
Cookbook Recipe
Chinese Herbal Chicken Soup
 
Cookbook Recipe
Oat Bran Breakfast
 



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Cookbook Recipe
Raine's Vegetarian Guernsey Bean Jar
I was born and raised in Guernsey, in the Channel Islands, which is part of the British Isles although not part of the UK. Guernsey Bean Jar has been part of island life for centuries. In the past the bakers of Guernsey used to let islanders put their prepared bean jars in the warm ovens overnight after they had finished cooking the bread. Often the bean jars - which is the name of the dish itself and also the earthenware dish it is traditionally cooked in - were transported to and from homes and the bakers on the buses for the equivalent of a few pennies a time. By the morning they were well cooked and ready to collect by the owner or to come back on the bus! the island is only 9 miles by 3 miles so this was a good system. Many islanders ate the dish for breakfast until around the 1920s. As with many traditional recipes, there are lots of variations and family recipes are a well guarded secret with the tradition being said that no two Bean Jar recipes are alike. Some use different types and quantities of beans and there is even a vegetarian version these days, though traditionally it is a dish similar to the French cassoulet (Guernsey was originally part of Normandy, France) that includes a beef shin bone or pig's trotter. This simple, cheap dish was a staple of my childhood. It was considered nourishing in the same way that some consider chicken soup or beef tea nourishing. As a child in the 60s, if I had been unwell and was beginning to feel better, mum used to make a bean jar as this was considered - if not a cure all, then at least supportive of a convalescing body And the immune system. I have to say as a 49 year old I have not had a day off work sick since I was pregnant 23 years ago so perhaps there is something to the claims of health giving properties of bean jar! The fantastic quality, organic veg fresh from the garden throughout my childhood, grown by my dad, no doubt helped too. So in summary I am choosing Bean Jar because in my native Guernsey it is one of a handful of culturally important dishes that has been cooked and eaten for centuries and still is today. It is a cheap, staple, peasant dish made from dried haricot beans and butter beans that is pretty sound nutritionally. Apart from being a good, cheap, nutritious everyday dish, it is also considered a good dish to give to convalescents and has the warm, comforting associations in my memory that dishes like this bring. Recovering at home from recurrent tonsillitis as a child and lying on the sofa with a real fire burning in the hearth, whilst mum made a Bean Jar to help "build me up" when I had been off my food for a few days bring warm memories of my childhood home. Submitted by: "Raine Leary"

Cookbook Recipe
Hummus
We are a family of Vegans, mostly Raw-Vegans, and Protein (amino-acids) are a concern for all, specially Vegans. - it is not really hard to find Amino acids in a Plant-Based diet. And Hummus is one of many choices we find. Submitted by: "Patricia Melo-Gach"

Cookbook Recipe
arroz caldo
Whenever I got sick with a cold, flu, or other illness as a child, my mother made me arroz caldo, a Filipino rice porridge or congee. I now make it for my family when they are sick, it’s like America’s chicken soup, but better. There are many variations on congee from several Asian cultures. My husband is Korean and they call it juk. In the wintertime, arroz caldo is a welcome comfort food for me. The rice breaks down after prolonged cooking and is therefore easily digestible. Depending on how you season it, the dish is also very mild and bland which is recommended for upset stomachs. It soothes an irritated stomach and also can add bulk to bowel contents, easing diarrhea symptoms. Garlic and ginger not only add flavor, they have several medicinal benefits and have been shown to be antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory (for brevity, here are Wikipedia articles for each: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garlic, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginger). Image from: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_c8EvO8w9_94/TUi9yqErl-I/AAAAAAAAAH8/xR0rARWmu_g/s1600/arroz%2Bcaldo.jpg Submitted by: "Sharon Gibson"

Cookbook Recipe
Green papaya and pork soup
I have 2 children and am still nursing my youngest (8 months). I wanted to choose a dish usually prepared for nursing mums. An Indian friend reccommended minced goat meat curry or green papaya curry. I did some research and found that green papaya soup with pork is often given to postpartum and nursing mums in many parts of Asia, including China. I live in Hong Kong, China, so Green Papaya Soup with Pork seemed the perfect choice. As in many Chinese recipes, each ingredient is chosen for specific reasons. Green (unripe) papaya contains a latex which mimics the hormone oxytocin. Oxytocin can induce labour, so pregnant women should not eat it (a 2002 study on green papaya and rats by Adebiyi, Adaikan and Prasad also found this effect), but also promotes lactation, making it helpful to nursing mums. Green papaya is also said to improve breast tissue (many mothers in Taiwan give it to their daughters, apparently, see eggwansfoododyssey.com 'food that grows your breasts'!) and relaxation, which support milk let-down. Red dates are so nutritious that they are called by the Chinese the King of Nuts (bai guo zhi wang). Chock full of vitamins and minerals, they are given to those recovering from birth and illness. Their phosphorous and iron help prevent anaemia; they also are said to increase the white blood cell count, strengthening the immune system. In the West, pork is thought to be more likely to provoke a reaction in the baby's system; in Hong Kong, pork is viewed as nutritious and strengthening, especially if cooked on the bone. Submitted by: "Micheline Stockton"

Cookbook Recipe
Chinese Herbal Chicken Soup
This is my cultural healthy food that my family usually eat. Even though we (my family) live in Indonesia, we are basically Chinese, so the culture of the Chinese is still held strong. This soup basically contains healthy herbs (which is really good for health): Solomon seal rhizome (玉竹片 yu zhu pian) contains Vitamin A and is believed to be moisturizing and good for dry and coarse skin. It is also used in the lowering of blood sugar levels and is good for strengthening the respiratory system Codonopsis root (dang shen 党参) is said to promote salivation and aid digestion, relieve diarrhoea and severe coughing, reduce nausea and weakness after severe bleeding, activate metabolism and improve blood circulation, stabilizes nervousness, and counter extreme mental and physical fatigue. Sounds like a wonder herb doesn’t it? Euryale seeds / fox nuts (qian shi 芡实) are believed to strengthen the kidneys and enhance sperm production. Figs (wu hua guo 无花果) are supposed to reduce allergic symptoms such as asthma, bronchitis and nasal inflammation, strengthen the lungs and stomach, and treat constipation, indigestion, piles and diabetes. Red dates (hong zao 红枣) are used in many chinese soups and drinks for their sweet taste. They contain Vitamin B, C, E, P, phosphorus, calcium, iron and are believed to slow down the growth of cancer cells. Chinese wolfberries or goji berries (gou zi ji 枸杞子) are extremely good for improving eyesight. Besides using them in soups and drinks, they can also be consumed directly. Chinese wolfberries are also beneficial for the liver. Submitted by: "Robert Luo"

Cookbook Recipe
Oat Bran Breakfast
Porridge is a comfort food to me. I used to eat it for breakfast with my Gido (Ukrainian for grandfather) when I visited. We both loved adding lots of milk to it to make it soupy. I am currently recovering from chemotherapy and radiation. As such, I try to eat foods that are easy to digest, nutritious, and vegan. I now eat this every morning for breakfast. Submitted by: "jtomkow"

This ebook is a compilation of recipes built by members of a Facebook group who completed a 6 week course through Coursera (a MOOC free learning environment) in July 2013, called Nutrition for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. An assignment asked members to upload a photo and recipe of a dish that had cultural or personal meaning to them; a dish that was traditionally said to have healing properties or be a healthful dish. The assignment asked the course members to analyse the nutrition of their chosen dish. As the group has members across the globe, we thought it would be good to compile these dishes into an ebook to share with each other and the world. Happy healthy eating. Bon appetit!

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