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Outdoor Cooking with Friends: A Bronze Award Project by Troop #4672
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Outdoor Cooking with Friends: A Bronze Award Project by Troop #4672


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We decided to make an outdoor recipe book because we all like being outdoors and have been outside more with our families since COVID. We think people are outside more because of COVID and it’d be good to have recipes for when people are spending time outside. Also this recipe book may teach others how to eat healthy while being outdoors [instead of eating fast processed foods]. This recipe book may teach others how to be prepared while spending time outdoors, like how we should have food we can make when we are hiking. Finally we think this recipe book will be important to have in case you don’t know how or what food to cook or make when you are outdoors.

We dedicate this book to our amazing troop leaders and volunteers, who help us and will support us at any time in life. We also dedicate this book to our friends and family who help support us and keep us on track. Thank you for helping support us friends, family, troop leaders and volunteers.

Before we enjoy some campfire Yummies, let's talk a bit about campfire safety (*The following information was taught to us by our amazing troop leaders and volunteers at troop meetings*) :

 Read more...

We decided to make an outdoor recipe book because we all like being outdoors and have been outside more with our families since COVID. We think people are outside more because of COVID and it’d be good to have recipes for when people are spending time outside. Also this recipe book may teach others how to eat healthy while being outdoors [instead of eating fast processed foods]. This recipe book may teach others how to be prepared while spending time outdoors, like how we should have food we can make when we are hiking. Finally we think this recipe book will be important to have in case you don’t know how or what food to cook or make when you are outdoors.

We dedicate this book to our amazing troop leaders and volunteers, who help us and will support us at any time in life. We also dedicate this book to our friends and family who help support us and keep us on track. Thank you for helping support us friends, family, troop leaders and volunteers.

Before we enjoy some campfire Yummies, let's talk a bit about campfire safety (*The following information was taught to us by our amazing troop leaders and volunteers at troop meetings*) :

CAMPFIRES:

*ALWAYS follow the principles of “Leave No Trace”

*ALWAYS check local fire conditions and weather to make sure it is not too dry or windy for a safe fire

*Hair should be tied back. No loose sweater pull strings, no dangled jewelry and roll up loose sleeves!

*An adult (18 years or older) must ALWAYS be present tending to the campfire and is responsible for extinguishing (a fire should NOT be left unattended!).

*ONLY ADULTS TEND TO/EXTINGUISH CAMPFIRES!

*An adult must ALWAYS be supervising use of a campfire stove (if using)

*Bucket of water is ALWAYS present near the campfire to extinguish fire

*Closed toe shoes (like sneakers) must always be worn around a campfire (NO close toed-open side sandals) so embers/ash do not burn you!!

*NO running around the campfire

*Make sure grass/leaves are NOT touching the fire ring and are cleared from the area so don’t start a forest fire!

*DO NOT store wood for campfire touching the fire ring

*DO NOT touch shoes to fire ring--they’ll melt!

*THREE points of contact ALWAYS when cooking around a campfire: Knee of ground; Hand of same knee on ground; and other hand free to cook/build fire

*Use only the amount of wood needed for cooking...don’t be wasteful (use resources wisely)

*To Start a fire you need 3 types of wood:

TINDER: the size of your pinky (such as twigs, dried bark from a dead tree, dry pinecone, or a fire starter)

KINDLING: the size of your wrist (dead branches/wood splices)

LOGS (make sure you follow local camping ordinances...some campgrounds do not allow you to bring your own wood & require you to purchase this from the campground to prevent the spreading of tree diseases)

Fire Starter recipes to use as tinder:

**Cotton ball dipped in petroleum jelly (assemble at campfire)

**Dryer lint wrapped in wax paper (premake and bring with you)

**Egg Carton filled with sawdust and covered in wax (premake and bring with you)

*TO EXTINGUISH A CAMPFIRE:

DO NOT dump a full bucket of water onto the fire...this makes dangerous embers which can cause a wildfire, steam that can burn you & smoke that makes breathing difficult.

With a shovel or long branch, disperse hot coals by spreading them out. Scoop handfuls of water onto the fire to extinguish

CAMPFIRE COOKING SAFETY:

*ANYTHING that is used to cook in/over a campfire or camp stove is HOT and will burn you...DO NOT touch metal that has been in the campfire, such as roasting sticks. Wait for it to cool!

*ALWAYS wash hands prior to and after handling food.

Do not touch your face, sneeze near food, or lick your fingers while preparing food as this may spread bacteria and germs.

*Any open wounds, cuts, or sores on your hands should be covered so you don’t spread germs to others and food materials do not cause an infection for you.

*Do not touch raw meat (if you do, ALWAYS wash hands after touching raw meat or meat juices).

*Do not let raw meat or meat juices touch other foods.

*Do not eat raw or undercooked eggs.

*Make sure your cooking area is clean.

*If using electrical appliances, keep them away from water at all times!

*DO NOT spray any pressurized cooking ingredients (such as cooking spray or whipped topping) near an open flame as this may cause an explosion.

*Make sure meat and food that needs to be kept cold is stored in a cooler with ice until it is used. The inside temperature of a cooler storing food should not exceed (be higher than) 40 degrees.

*If you are cutting any food with a knife, adult supervision is required.

*DO NOT leave food on the fire unattended.

*DO NOT throw trash or food into your campfire, this will attract wild animals!

LEAVE NO TRACE PRINCIPLES:

* The leave no trace seven principles were taught to us by our amazing troop leaders and volunteers*

(Girl Scout Eco Camper Badge Requirements, page 3, www.girlscouts.org)

(Leave No Trace Outdoor Ethics, USDA Forest Service, https://www.fs.fed.us/lei/no-trace-ethics.php)

1. Plan ahead. “Know before you go!” Plan so you leave nothing behind. Get to know the area you’ll visit. Repackage and store food in reusable containers.

2. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. Walk only on existing trails and camp on surfaces that are already impacted or are durable enough to withstand repeated trampling.

3. Dispose of waste properly. Carry out what you carry in—never dump anything on a campsite or into a water source.

4. Leave nature as you find it. Don’t collect or take anything from the outdoors.

5. Minimize campfire impacts. Instead of using firewood and building campfires, pack a lightweight cooking stove and lantern if possible.

6. Respect wildlife by checking them out at a distance. Never approach, feed, or follow them. Seal food tightly and store it out of reach of animals. Do not throw food in campfires. Do not throw food on trails (not even a banana peel!)

7. Be considerate of other visitors. Remember you’re not alone in the wilderness. Keep your voices down and let nature be the loudest sounds you hear.

BY: FINNLEY A., MADELYN D., AUBRIE M., KRISTIANA N., AUBREY O. AND ANNA S.
...Show less

Cookbook Recipes
Filter By & Scroll Down:                  
Cookbook Recipe
Campfire Cinnamon Roll
 
Cookbook Recipe
Egg in a Frame
 
Cookbook Recipe
EGGS
 
Cookbook Recipe
Walking Breakfast
 
Cookbook Recipe
Breakfast Muffin Tin Pancakes
 
Cookbook Recipe
Pudgy Pie Pancake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Pancake Bake
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ham and cheese Pudgy Pie sandwich
 
Cookbook Recipe
Ham and cheese pudgy pie #2
 
Cookbook Recipe
Flower Shaped Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwiches
 
Cookbook Recipe
Walking Salad
 
Cookbook Recipe
Campfire Pigs in a Blanket
 
Cookbook Recipe
Chocolate Pie Iron Sandwich
 
Cookbook Recipe
Cracker Stackers
 
Cookbook Recipe
Hot Dogs on a Stick
 
Cookbook Recipe
Crabby Dog
 
Cookbook Recipe
Hamburgers in Foil Packets
 
Cookbook Recipe
Hot Dog and Potato Foil Packet
 
Cookbook Recipe
Reuben Pudgy Pie
 
Cookbook Recipe
Pizza Pudgy Pie
 
Cookbook Recipe
Cucumber Salad
 
Cookbook Recipe
Pudgy Pie Grilled Cheese
 
Cookbook Recipe
Campfire Hamburger with a Pretzel Bun
 
Cookbook Recipe
Piggies in a Tasty Blanket
 
Cookbook Recipe
Camping Cookie Sandwich
 
Cookbook Recipe
Roasted Starburst
 
Cookbook Recipe
Mamma Nigs Easy Camping Pistachio Torte
 
Cookbook Recipe
Golden Milk
 
Cookbook Recipe
Hershey’s Chocolate Dip
 
Cookbook Recipe
Campfire S’more Cone
 
Cookbook Recipe
Snicker S'Mores
 
Cookbook Recipe
Toasted Strawberry S’More Skewers
 
Cookbook Recipe
Roasted Sweet Potatoes
 
Cookbook Recipe
Pudgy Pie Hash Brown Patties
 
Cookbook Recipe
Cooked Pineapple
 
Cookbook Recipe
Campfire Popcorn
 
Cookbook Recipe
Toasty Fire Corn
 
Cookbook Recipe
Fruit Kabob
 
Cookbook Recipe
Camping Banana
 
Cookbook Recipe
Simple Trail Mix
 
Cookbook Recipe
Skewered Cheesy Pretzel Bites
 
Cookbook Recipe
Walking Banana Creme Pies
 



Filter By & Scroll Down:                  

Cookbook Recipe
Campfire Cinnamon Roll
Perfect campfire breakfast! Easy and good!

Cookbook Recipe
Egg in a Frame
*A yummy take on a breakfast sandwich!

Cookbook Recipe
EGGS
Easy outdoor eggs that can be made over a campfire!

Cookbook Recipe
Walking Breakfast
"My mom and I made this because we like quick and easy meals."

Cookbook Recipe
Breakfast Muffin Tin Pancakes
TIP: "You can use a muffin tin or a cast iron with cookie slices built in!"

Cookbook Recipe
Pudgy Pie Pancake
We love pancakes and this recipe makes it easy to have when outdoors! TIP: Use indirect heat (such as place over a piece of wood over white coals) so the bottom of pancake doesn’t burn! SOOO YUMMY!!

Cookbook Recipe
Pancake Bake
Pancakes are what we love and enjoying them outdoors together is a family favorite! TIP: Have an adult assist with taking these off the campfire!!

Cookbook Recipe
Ham and cheese Pudgy Pie sandwich
Ooeey gooeey grilled ham sandwiches...Yummy!! TIP: Use an oven mitt to open pudgy pie maker when hot to avoid burning your hand. And flip every two minutes until brown and is bubbling.

Cookbook Recipe
Ham and cheese pudgy pie #2
Grilled ham sandwiches are always a hit especially when oozing cheesy goodness!!

Cookbook Recipe
Flower Shaped Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwiches
A fun twist on PB&J that's easy to transport!!

Cookbook Recipe
Walking Salad
My family loves anything simple to eat and this is a surprise that's easy to make, fast & tastes so good!

Cookbook Recipe
Campfire Pigs in a Blanket
A fun and yummy twist on a normal hot dog!! TIP: Watch the crescent roll dough carefully so it doesn’t overcook; Rotate Hot dog above campfire or grill

Cookbook Recipe
Chocolate Pie Iron Sandwich
Chocolate sandwiches are ALWAYS a hit!

Cookbook Recipe
Cracker Stackers
Mix and match toppings to try new combos!

Cookbook Recipe
Hot Dogs on a Stick
This is a super easy recipe for all who love hot dogs! TIP: You may use a s’more stick in place of a stick you find outside.

Cookbook Recipe
Crabby Dog
Have fun with your food and outdoor cooking!

Cookbook Recipe
Hamburgers in Foil Packets
We enjoy this for all the toppings that can be added! TIP: Check often so it does not burn.

Cookbook Recipe
Hot Dog and Potato Foil Packet
TIP: Check often so this doesn't burn!

Cookbook Recipe
Reuben Pudgy Pie
This is a fun twist on a pudgy pie and proof that almost anything can be turned into a pudgy pie!!

Cookbook Recipe
Pizza Pudgy Pie
We all love pizza!!

Cookbook Recipe
Cucumber Salad
This is a great make ahead recipe!!

Cookbook Recipe
Pudgy Pie Grilled Cheese
Grilled Cheese outdoors...need we say more?!?

Cookbook Recipe
Campfire Hamburger with a Pretzel Bun
Bring your appetite. This is worth the effort!! YUMMY!!

Cookbook Recipe
Piggies in a Tasty Blanket
TIPS: Wrap the dough tightly and pinch the ends so it stays on while cooking! Try different condiments for new tastes!

Cookbook Recipe
Camping Cookie Sandwich
Bigger cookie = better snack!

Cookbook Recipe
Roasted Starburst
TIP: Wait for it to cool before you eat it.

Cookbook Recipe
Mamma Nigs Easy Camping Pistachio Torte
Yummies while outdoors is why we love this one! TIP: Make sure cups are surrounded by ice so they don’t tip over in the ice.

Cookbook Recipe
Golden Milk
TIP: Keep stirring to prevent burning.

Cookbook Recipe
Hershey’s Chocolate Dip
TIPS: Don’t eat to fast and burn your mouth Make sure to use a fire safe pan

Cookbook Recipe
Campfire S’more Cone
We love this because we love Peeps!! TIPS: Check often so it does not burn. Be very careful not to burn yourself.

Cookbook Recipe
Snicker S'Mores
We all love S'Mores and trying different combinations to make!

Cookbook Recipe
Toasted Strawberry S’More Skewers
Enjoy just like a regular s’more with a fruity twist!

Cookbook Recipe
Roasted Sweet Potatoes
We love this recipe for it's surprising yummy-ness!! TIP: Use hot coals instead of flames so potatoes cook evenly and do not burn.

Cookbook Recipe
Pudgy Pie Hash Brown Patties
We love potatoes and pudgy pies...this snack combines both our loves!

Cookbook Recipe
Cooked Pineapple
This is an easy but oh so delicious campfire snack!! TIPS: You can use canned or fresh pineapple. Use a cooking grate to brown evenly.

Cookbook Recipe
Campfire Popcorn
Popcorn outdoors makes for some great memories!! TIP: Wear oven mitts when placing aluminum foil on/off grill/campfire or when opening the aluminum foil.

Cookbook Recipe
Toasty Fire Corn
Try sweet or savory! White cheddar is my FAVORITE!! TIP: Be careful when opening, the steam is HOT!

Cookbook Recipe
Fruit Kabob
TIP: Eat over plate or it will get messy.

Cookbook Recipe
Camping Banana
Make more than 1 - they are really good! TIP: We used a double pronged marshmallow roaster to set the banana on so we could roast it

Cookbook Recipe
Simple Trail Mix
Your troop can make it your own by each member bringing an ingredient.

Cookbook Recipe
Skewered Cheesy Pretzel Bites
We love being outside and cooking over a campfire! TIP: Be careful...cheese may be hot! SOOO delicious!

Cookbook Recipe
Walking Banana Creme Pies
Walking anything's are great for taking everywhere! TIP: You can make “Walking” desserts with any mini cookie bags!

We decided to make an outdoor recipe book because we all like being outdoors and have been outside more with our families since COVID. We think people are outside more because of COVID and it’d be good to have recipes for when people are spending time outside. Also this recipe book may teach others how to eat healthy while being outdoors [instead of eating fast processed foods]. This recipe book may teach others how to be prepared while spending time outdoors, like how we should have food we can make when we are hiking. Finally we think this recipe book will be important to have in case you don’t know how or what food to cook or make when you are outdoors. We dedicate this book to our amazing troop leaders and volunteers, who help us and will support us at any time in life. We also dedicate this book to our friends and family who help support us and keep us on track. Thank you for helping support us friends, family, troop leaders and volunteers. Before we enjoy some campfire Yummies, let's talk a bit about campfire safety (*The following information was taught to us by our amazing troop leaders and volunteers at troop meetings*) : CAMPFIRES: *ALWAYS follow the principles of “Leave No Trace” *ALWAYS check local fire conditions and weather to make sure it is not too dry or windy for a safe fire *Hair should be tied back. No loose sweater pull strings, no dangled jewelry and roll up loose sleeves! *An adult (18 years or older) must ALWAYS be present tending to the campfire and is responsible for extinguishing (a fire should NOT be left unattended!). *ONLY ADULTS TEND TO/EXTINGUISH CAMPFIRES! *An adult must ALWAYS be supervising use of a campfire stove (if using) *Bucket of water is ALWAYS present near the campfire to extinguish fire *Closed toe shoes (like sneakers) must always be worn around a campfire (NO close toed-open side sandals) so embers/ash do not burn you!! *NO running around the campfire *Make sure grass/leaves are NOT touching the fire ring and are cleared from the area so don’t start a forest fire! *DO NOT store wood for campfire touching the fire ring *DO NOT touch shoes to fire ring--they’ll melt! *THREE points of contact ALWAYS when cooking around a campfire: Knee of ground; Hand of same knee on ground; and other hand free to cook/build fire *Use only the amount of wood needed for cooking...don’t be wasteful (use resources wisely) *To Start a fire you need 3 types of wood: TINDER: the size of your pinky (such as twigs, dried bark from a dead tree, dry pinecone, or a fire starter) KINDLING: the size of your wrist (dead branches/wood splices) LOGS (make sure you follow local camping ordinances...some campgrounds do not allow you to bring your own wood & require you to purchase this from the campground to prevent the spreading of tree diseases) Fire Starter recipes to use as tinder: **Cotton ball dipped in petroleum jelly (assemble at campfire) **Dryer lint wrapped in wax paper (premake and bring with you) **Egg Carton filled with sawdust and covered in wax (premake and bring with you) *TO EXTINGUISH A CAMPFIRE: DO NOT dump a full bucket of water onto the fire...this makes dangerous embers which can cause a wildfire, steam that can burn you & smoke that makes breathing difficult. With a shovel or long branch, disperse hot coals by spreading them out. Scoop handfuls of water onto the fire to extinguish CAMPFIRE COOKING SAFETY: *ANYTHING that is used to cook in/over a campfire or camp stove is HOT and will burn you...DO NOT touch metal that has been in the campfire, such as roasting sticks. Wait for it to cool! *ALWAYS wash hands prior to and after handling food. Do not touch your face, sneeze near food, or lick your fingers while preparing food as this may spread bacteria and germs. *Any open wounds, cuts, or sores on your hands should be covered so you don’t spread germs to others and food materials do not cause an infection for you. *Do not touch raw meat (if you do, ALWAYS wash hands after touching raw meat or meat juices). *Do not let raw meat or meat juices touch other foods. *Do not eat raw or undercooked eggs. *Make sure your cooking area is clean. *If using electrical appliances, keep them away from water at all times! *DO NOT spray any pressurized cooking ingredients (such as cooking spray or whipped topping) near an open flame as this may cause an explosion. *Make sure meat and food that needs to be kept cold is stored in a cooler with ice until it is used. The inside temperature of a cooler storing food should not exceed (be higher than) 40 degrees. *If you are cutting any food with a knife, adult supervision is required. *DO NOT leave food on the fire unattended. *DO NOT throw trash or food into your campfire, this will attract wild animals! LEAVE NO TRACE PRINCIPLES: * The leave no trace seven principles were taught to us by our amazing troop leaders and volunteers* (Girl Scout Eco Camper Badge Requirements, page 3, www.girlscouts.org) (Leave No Trace Outdoor Ethics, USDA Forest Service, https://www.fs.fed.us/lei/no-trace-ethics.php) 1. Plan ahead. “Know before you go!” Plan so you leave nothing behind. Get to know the area you’ll visit. Repackage and store food in reusable containers. 2. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. Walk only on existing trails and camp on surfaces that are already impacted or are durable enough to withstand repeated trampling. 3. Dispose of waste properly. Carry out what you carry in—never dump anything on a campsite or into a water source. 4. Leave nature as you find it. Don’t collect or take anything from the outdoors. 5. Minimize campfire impacts. Instead of using firewood and building campfires, pack a lightweight cooking stove and lantern if possible. 6. Respect wildlife by checking them out at a distance. Never approach, feed, or follow them. Seal food tightly and store it out of reach of animals. Do not throw food in campfires. Do not throw food on trails (not even a banana peel!) 7. Be considerate of other visitors. Remember you’re not alone in the wilderness. Keep your voices down and let nature be the loudest sounds you hear. BY: FINNLEY A., MADELYN D., AUBRIE M., KRISTIANA N., AUBREY O. AND ANNA S.

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Cookbook Recipe
Outdoor Cooking with Friends: A Bronze Award Project by Troop #4672

FREE

We decided to make an outdoor recipe book because we all like being outdoors and have been outside more with our families since COVID. We think people are outside more because of COVID and it’d be good to have recipes for when people are spending time outside. Also this recipe book may teach others how to eat healthy while being outdoors [instead of eating fast processed foods]. This recipe book may teach others how to be prepared while spending time outdoors, like how we should have food we can make when we are hiking. Finally we think this recipe book will be important to have in case you don’t know how or what food to cook or make when you are outdoors. We dedicate this book to our amazing troop leaders and volunteers, who help us and will support us at any time in life. We also dedicate this book to our friends and family who help support us and keep us on track. Thank you for helping support us friends, family, troop leaders and volunteers. Before we enjoy some campfire Yummies, let's talk a bit about campfire safety (*The following information was taught to us by our amazing troop leaders and volunteers at troop meetings*) : CAMPFIRES: *ALWAYS follow the principles of “Leave No Trace” *ALWAYS check local fire conditions and weather to make sure it is not too dry or windy for a safe fire *Hair should be tied back. No loose sweater pull strings, no dangled jewelry and roll up loose sleeves! *An adult (18 years or older) must ALWAYS be present tending to the campfire and is responsible for extinguishing (a fire should NOT be left unattended!). *ONLY ADULTS TEND TO/EXTINGUISH CAMPFIRES! *An adult must ALWAYS be supervising use of a campfire stove (if using) *Bucket of water is ALWAYS present near the campfire to extinguish fire *Closed toe shoes (like sneakers) must always be worn around a campfire (NO close toed-open side sandals) so embers/ash do not burn you!! *NO running around the campfire *Make sure grass/leaves are NOT touching the fire ring and are cleared from the area so don’t start a forest fire! *DO NOT store wood for campfire touching the fire ring *DO NOT touch shoes to fire ring--they’ll melt! *THREE points of contact ALWAYS when cooking around a campfire: Knee of ground; Hand of same knee on ground; and other hand free to cook/build fire *Use only the amount of wood needed for cooking...don’t be wasteful (use resources wisely) *To Start a fire you need 3 types of wood: TINDER: the size of your pinky (such as twigs, dried bark from a dead tree, dry pinecone, or a fire starter) KINDLING: the size of your wrist (dead branches/wood splices) LOGS (make sure you follow local camping ordinances...some campgrounds do not allow you to bring your own wood & require you to purchase this from the campground to prevent the spreading of tree diseases) Fire Starter recipes to use as tinder: **Cotton ball dipped in petroleum jelly (assemble at campfire) **Dryer lint wrapped in wax paper (premake and bring with you) **Egg Carton filled with sawdust and covered in wax (premake and bring with you) *TO EXTINGUISH A CAMPFIRE: DO NOT dump a full bucket of water onto the fire...this makes dangerous embers which can cause a wildfire, steam that can burn you & smoke that makes breathing difficult. With a shovel or long branch, disperse hot coals by spreading them out. Scoop handfuls of water onto the fire to extinguish CAMPFIRE COOKING SAFETY: *ANYTHING that is used to cook in/over a campfire or camp stove is HOT and will burn you...DO NOT touch metal that has been in the campfire, such as roasting sticks. Wait for it to cool! *ALWAYS wash hands prior to and after handling food. Do not touch your face, sneeze near food, or lick your fingers while preparing food as this may spread bacteria and germs. *Any open wounds, cuts, or sores on your hands should be covered so you don’t spread germs to others and food materials do not cause an infection for you. *Do not touch raw meat (if you do, ALWAYS wash hands after touching raw meat or meat juices). *Do not let raw meat or meat juices touch other foods. *Do not eat raw or undercooked eggs. *Make sure your cooking area is clean. *If using electrical appliances, keep them away from water at all times! *DO NOT spray any pressurized cooking ingredients (such as cooking spray or whipped topping) near an open flame as this may cause an explosion. *Make sure meat and food that needs to be kept cold is stored in a cooler with ice until it is used. The inside temperature of a cooler storing food should not exceed (be higher than) 40 degrees. *If you are cutting any food with a knife, adult supervision is required. *DO NOT leave food on the fire unattended. *DO NOT throw trash or food into your campfire, this will attract wild animals! LEAVE NO TRACE PRINCIPLES: * The leave no trace seven principles were taught to us by our amazing troop leaders and volunteers* (Girl Scout Eco Camper Badge Requirements, page 3, www.girlscouts.org) (Leave No Trace Outdoor Ethics, USDA Forest Service, https://www.fs.fed.us/lei/no-trace-ethics.php) 1. Plan ahead. “Know before you go!” Plan so you leave nothing behind. Get to know the area you’ll visit. Repackage and store food in reusable containers. 2. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. Walk only on existing trails and camp on surfaces that are already impacted or are durable enough to withstand repeated trampling. 3. Dispose of waste properly. Carry out what you carry in—never dump anything on a campsite or into a water source. 4. Leave nature as you find it. Don’t collect or take anything from the outdoors. 5. Minimize campfire impacts. Instead of using firewood and building campfires, pack a lightweight cooking stove and lantern if possible. 6. Respect wildlife by checking them out at a distance. Never approach, feed, or follow them. Seal food tightly and store it out of reach of animals. Do not throw food in campfires. Do not throw food on trails (not even a banana peel!) 7. Be considerate of other visitors. Remember you’re not alone in the wilderness. Keep your voices down and let nature be the loudest sounds you hear. BY: FINNLEY A., MADELYN D., AUBRIE M., KRISTIANA N., AUBREY O. AND ANNA S.


 
 
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